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Ild^juu^ THE V. 

BRETHREN'S ALMANAC 

FOR THE UNITED STATES, 

FOE THE YEAE OF OUE LOED AND SAVIOUE, JESUS OHEIST, 






18fl 



9 



BKING THE TfalRD AFTER BISSEXTILE OR LEAP YEAR, AND AFTER THE FOURTH OF JULY 

the Ninety-sixth of American Independence. 




CONTAINING, BESIDES THE ASTRONOMICAL DEPARTMENT, A LIST OF THE 

NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF MINISTERS, A SYNOPSIS OF THE TRUTHS 

PREACHED BY THEM, A BRIEF SKETCH OF THE HISTORY 

OF THE CHURCH, AND OTHER USEFUL AND 

INSTRUCTIVE READING MATTER.' 



PUBLISHED BY 
H . Tl. HOX,SI^TGrER., 

^TYRONE, PENNA. 



J 



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ECLIPSES OF THE YEAR 1871. 

There will be four Eclipses this year, two of the Sun and two of the Moon. 

The first is a partial Eclipse of the Moon, Sanuary 6th, 4 o'clock 16 min. in th« evening. 
The Moon rises at 4 o'clock 42 m. partly eclipsed on the western limb, in the Middle States, 
and rises at 5 o'clock eclipsed in the Southern Scales. Ends in the Middle States at 5 o'clock 
45 m. and in the Southern States at 5 o'clock 25 m. in the evening. 

The second is an annular Eclipse of the Sun, June 17th, 9 o'cl. 30 m. in the evening ; there- 
fore invisible here; visible on the Indian, North Pacific, South Pacific Ocean and Australia. 

The third is a partial Eclipse of the Moon, July 2d, 8 o'clock 32 in. in the morning ; con- 
eequently invisible here ; visible on the Pacific Ocean. 

The fourth is a total Eclipse of the Sun, December 11th, 11 o'clock 8 m. in the evening ; 
invisible here; visible on the Pacific and Indian Ocean, and o^ the southern part of Asia. 
The total line will pass through the Indian Ocean and the northern part of Australia and will 
end near the Equator on the Pacific Ocean. 






MEMORANDA FOR 18T1. 

Jan. 1, 2d Sund. after Christmas; 6, Epiph.; 8, 1st S, aft. Epiph.; 15, 2d S. aft. Epiph.; 18, 
Franklin b.; 20, Fab. Seb.; 22, 3d S. aft. Epiph.; 25, Conv. of St. Paul ; 29, 4th S. aft. Epiph.— 
Feb. 2, Candle M.; 5. Septuages. Sund.; 12, Sexag. Sund.; 14, Valentine; 19, Quinquages. 
Sund.; 21, Shrove T.; 22, Ash Wedm; 24, St. Matt.; 26, 1st Sund. in Lent.;— March 1, Ember- 
dav; 5, 2d S. in Lent; 3, 3d S. in Lent.; 17, St. Patrick; 19, 4th S. in Lent; 25, Annun. of 
Virg. Mary; 26, 5th S. in Lent,— April 2, Palm Sund.; 6, Mound Thursday; 7, Good Friday; 
9, Easter Sund.; 16, 1st S. after Easter; 23, 2d S. aft. Easter; 25, St. Mark; 30. 3d S. aft. 
Easter.— May 1, Sts. Phil. & James ; 3, Inv. of Cr.; 7, 4th S. aft. Easter ; 5, 5th S. aft. Easter; 
18. Ascension day ; 21, 6th S. aft. Easter ; 28, Whit-Sunday ; 31, Emberday — June 4, Trinity 
Sund.: 8, Corpus Chr.; 11, 1st S. aft. Trim; 17, St. Alban; 18, 2d S. aft. Trim; 24, John Bap.; 

25, 3d S.aft. Trim; 29, St. Peter.— July 2, 4th S. aft. Trim ^Independence; 9, 5th S. aft. Trim; 
15, Apostle's day ; 16, 6th S. aft. Trim; 22, Mary Magd.; 23, 7th S. aft. Trim; 25, St. James 
& St, Anne; 30, 8th S. aft. Trim — Auq. 1, Lammasriay ; 6, 9th S. aft. Trim; 13, 10th S. aft. 
Trim; 15, Asc. of Virg. Mary; 20, 11th S. aft. Trim; 24, St. Barth.; 27, 12th S. aft. Trim; 
28 & 29. St. August & St. John b.— Sept. 3, 13th S. aft. Trim; 10, 14th S. aft. Trim; 17, 15th 
S. aft. Trim; 20, Emberday; 21, St, Matthew, Ev.; 24, 16th S. aft. Trim; 29. St. Michael.— 
Oct. 1, 17th S. aft. Trim; 2, Chr. Columb.; 8, 18th S. aft. Trim; 15, 19th 8. aft. Trin.; 18, St. 
Luke; 22, 20th S.aft. Trin.; 28, Sts. Simon & Jude; 39, 21st. Sun. aft. Trin.; 31. Hall. Eve.— 
Nov. 1, All-Saints' day; 5, 22d Sun. aft. Trin.; 12, 23d S. aft. Trin.; 19, 24th S. aft. Trin.; 

26, 25th S. aft, Trin.; 30, St. Andrew. — Dec. 3, 1st S. in Advent; 10, 2d S. in Adv.; 17, 3d S. 
in Adv.; 20, Emberd.; 25, Christm. d.; 27, St. John, Ev.; 28, Holy Innocents ; 31, Sylvester. 



EPOCHS 

Golden Number 10 

Epact 9 

Suiar Cycle 4 



OF 1 8 Tl. 

Dominical Letter A 

Roman Indiction 14 

Julian Period 6584 



The year 5032 of the Jewish Era commences on September 16th, 1871. 
The year 1288 of the Mahomedan Era commences on March 23d, 1871. 



Moveable Festivals 

Scptuagesima Sunday Feb. 5 

Quinquagesiina Sunday " 19 

Shrove Tuesday " 21 

Ash Wednesday " Tl 

Palm Sunday April 2 

Easier Sunday " 9 



Ascension; or, Holy Thursday May 18 

Whitsunday ; or, Pentecost " 28 

Trinity Sunday..... June 4 

Corpus Christi " 8 

First Sunday in Advent Dec. 3 

Sundays after Trinity are ' 26 



PERIGEE AND APOGEE OF THE MOON. 

MOON'S PERIGEE. 
January 2 & 18, February 13, March 10, April 7, May 5, June 3, July 1 & 29, August 26, 
September 20, October 16, November 13, December 12 & 31. 

MOON'S APOGEE. 
January 1 & 29, February 26, March 26, April 23, May 20, Juny 16, July 3 & 13, August 10, 
September 7, October 5, November 1 & 29, December 26. 

SEASONS. 

Sun enters T (Aries) March 20th, at 8 h. 12 m., evening ; Spring commences, days and 
nights are equal. 

Sua enters 22 (Cancer) June 21st, at 4 h. 40 m., afterm; Summer commences, the longest 
day occurs. 

Sun enters ^ (Libra) September 23d, at 6 h. 50 m., morn.; Autumn commences, days 
and nights are equal. 

Sun enters V> (Capricornus) December 22d, at 2 h. 58 m., morn.; Winter commences, 
and the shortest day occurs. 



Thought. — Keep the mind constant- 
ly filled with pure thoughts, and there 
will be no room for impure ones to 
come in ; so long as the measure is,, 
full of something good, it will hold 
nothing bad. Never think of anything 
bad. 



Select that course of life which is 
most excellent, and custom will make 
it the most delightful. 



The gem cannot be polished with- 
out friction, nor man perfected without 

adversity. 



ASTRONOMICAL CHARACTERS EXPLAINED. 

d Last Quarter. 



f) New Moon. O Full Moon. 

H Moon's ascending Node, or Dragon's head 
Moon's descending Node, or Dragon's tail 
V Moon's Ascension. 



D First Quarter. 

« Moon's Descenslon. 

]) Moon in Apogee— furthest from the earth, 

C Moon in Perigee— nearest to the earth. 



PLANETS AND ASPECTS. 



tj Saturn. 

If Jupiter, 
cf Mars. 
Sun. 



O. Venus. 

5 Mercury. 

© Earth. D Moon. 

y HerscheL 



<5 Conjunction, or planets In the same longitude. 
# Sextile, when they are 60 degrees apart. 
D Quartile, when they are 90 degrees distant. 
/\ Trine, when they were 120 degrees distant. 



SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC, OR HUMAN ANATOMY. 

* The Head axd Face.— y ARIES. The Ram. 



ARMS. 

Gemini. n 

The Twins. 



HEART. 

Leo. a 

The Lion. 



REINS. 

Libra. 

The Balance. 



Tnions. 

Sagittarius J: 

TLe Dowman. 



LK8. 

Aquarius. ^2. 

The Waterman. 




BOWELS. 

IIP Virgo. 

The Virgin. 



SECRETS. 

HI Bcprpio. 

The Scorpion. 



gjrrss. 

!£> Cupricrnns. 
The Goat. 



K 'the Fishes.— Tiik Feet. PISCES. 



Moveable Festivals 



Soptna^esima Sunday Feb. 5 

Quinqua£e«ima Sunday " 13 

Bhrove Tuesday " 21 

Ash Wednesday " 22 

Palm Sunday April 2 

Easter Sunday " 9 



Ascension; or, Holy Thursday May IS 

Whitsunday; «T, Pentecost ••" 28 

Trinity Sunday Juue 4 

Corpus Christ! *• S 

First Sunday in Advent Dec. 3 

Sundays after Trinity are 'J."> 



Chronological 

Cycles. 
Dominical Letter 
Golden Number 
Epact .... 
Solar Cycle . . 

K< ■inari llldiction 

Julian Period . 



A 
10 

5 

14 
6064 



The four Seasons or Cardinal Points. 
Vernal Equinix Sua ent. Aries the 20. Mar. Sh. 12 m. Even. 
Summer Solstice " " Cancer " 21. Juue lh.40m. Altera. 
Autnniual Eqaraox " " Libra " S3, s.-pt. S h. 60 m. Horn. 
Winter Solmice " " Capr. " TL D» c. It h. OS m. Morn. 



Ember Days. 
March 1. — May 31. —September 20. 



December 20. 



The Year 5032 of the Jewish Era commences on September 16th, 1871. 
The Year 1288 of the Mahomedan Era oommenoes on March 23d, 1871. 



WnitK. — Hard work is the grand 

t of success. Nothing l'U rags 

and poverty cun come of idleness. 101- 

bow grease is t lie only stuff to make 

. with. No sweat, no sweet. He 

who would have the crow's eggs must 



climb the tree. Everyman must build 
Up his own fortune now-a-dnys. Shirt- 
sleeves rolled up lead on to best broad- 
clofn; and he who is not ashamed of 
the apron will soon be able to do 
without it. 






First Month. 



JANUARY, 1871. 



31 Days. 



3 3 



Latitude of 
Southern States. 

SUN i MOON 
, risen & sets, r. & s. 
| h in.ih.Hi. 1 h. ra. 



Aspects of Planets 

and 
Other Miscellanies. 



Latitude of ) 
Middle State*. | 

SUN | MOON! 
rises & sets. t. As. 
h.m. i n.jai.J h. m. Irn. I 



Moon's 
Signs. 



Moon 
south. 



d. h. m. 



1) 

sT 

M. 
T. 
W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



I\Tew Year. 



Matt. 2. 



Day's length: 9 h. 14 m. 



7 9 4 51 1 42 j $ in Apogee. w 

7* 8 4 52 2 46 10 in Perigee. 
8!4 52 3 501 S rises 11 h. 30 m. 
814 52; 4 52|(SO ^so.lOh. 20. 
5 W&jSSkG, Sir. so.ll, 36. F\ 
rises jV-i-^S. Orion 10 h. 40. 



53 
4 53— 
4 53| 5 41 1 6 €'¥ Rigelso. 9, 49. 



7 23, 

7 23 i 
7 23! 

7 22 1 
7 221 
7 21 
7 21 



4 37 
4 37 
4 37 
4 38 
4 38 
4 39 
4 39 



1 51) 

2 54 

3 56 

4 59| 
6 2 

rises 

5 29 



4;£3 5! 
4W17 

5 « 
5]ttl3 
61M26 

6 HK 9 
6Ug23 



8 8 

8 50 

9 36 

10 27 

11 24 
mor. 

1 10 



2) 1 Sunday after Epiphany. Luke 2. 



Day's length: 9 h. 20 m. 



► s. 


8:7 6 


M. 


9J.7 6 


T. 


107 5 


W. 11|7 4 


T. 


12j7 3 


F. 


137 3 


S. 


1417 2 



4 54 1 6 36; £ stationary. 
4 54 7 42iDNeptmi0 
4 55 1 8 56 1 9 in Aphelion. 
4 56110 5,2/ south 10 h. 8 m. 
4 57J11 15! 6 f[o o rises 11 h. 9. 
6$ ? 



4 57 mor.; fL 
158 12 14 1 '* 



14. <?#0 



7 20 4 40 


6 24 


7 iff* 7 


7 20 4 40 


7 34 


71^21 


7 19 


4 41 


8 49 


8iSr 6 


7 19 4 41! 9 59 


8J&20 


7 18 


4 42111 11 


9j^ 5 


17 17 


4 43 mor. 


9j&19 


\l 17 


4 43 12 18 


9|« 3 



1 58 

2 44 

3 36 

4 22 

5 12 

6 
6 52 



3) 2. Sunday after Epiphany. John 2. 



Day's length: 9 h. 28 m. 



S. |J5;7 1,4 59 


1 lb 7* south 7 h. 53 m. 


7 164 44 


1 24H0 vei7 


7 44 


M. 11617 m 


2 28 Capella south 9 h. 12. 1 7 1514 45 


2 35|l0|& 1 


8 39 


T. |17|7 5 


3 4l)|d $0 inferior. 17 14 14 46 


3 46:10 &14 


9 29 


Yv'. 18 6 59 5 1 


4 51 J in Perigee. w 7 134 47 


4 5811 


&28 10 20 


T. 19|'6'SS f 5 '2 


5 56 ?5 b lises 5, 20, mor. 


7 12 ! 4 48 


6 111 


vaSlljll 10 


F. 20 j 6-581 5 %\ aets.>4&t20i Q enters ^ 
S. 121 16 57 ! 5 3| 5 52 ^P 9 sets 5 h. 41 m. 


7 12,4 48 


sets. ; 1 1 


v*24ill 42 


7 11J449 


5 40'l2 


fk 6; 12 40 



4 

M. ! 
T. ! 

w. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



Sunday after Epiphany. Matt. 8. 



Day's length: 9 h. 40 m. 



22 6 50 5 416 it i 2/ south 9 h. 40 ra. 

23 6 55 5 5 7 30 Regulus rises 6 h. 57. 

24 6 55!5 5 1 8 24 Sirius south 10 hi 13. 

25 6 54:5 6| 9 20 Orion south 9 h. 14 m. 

26 6 5315 71 10 15! % rises 10 h. 29 m. 

27 6 53!5 7 11 10 ^ 9 sets o h. 56m. 

28 6 52 J5 8 : mor. ! ^ 2 N . ^ ripes 4 , 44. 



7 10,4 50 



9 4 51 

8:4 52 



6 32 12 <&19; 1 36 

7 22 12 ^ i 2 27 

8 18 12 5J13| 3 US 
7,4 53 9 15 13 «2« 4 1 
6|4 5410 12 13W 7| 4 4i 
5'4 55 11 6 13*2*19, 5 24 
4 4 56 hidr.i!3t£* 1' 6 6 



5) 4. Sunday after Epiphany. Matt. 8. 
M. 



Day's length: 9 h. 54 m. 
4 0,13;^13| 6 4S 



T. 



29;«51 5 

30 651 3 
3i;6 50 l 5 1 



Oil 2 0|$ in Apo. £ station. |7 3 
9 12 56 Arctur rises 1 h . 3 m . 1 7 2 
Oi 1 541$ h % 11 south 9 h. 2.J7 1 



4 57 



1 58 
4 59 



12 



- i3 r- 

fc!4l**25 7 34 
5J14JM 81 8 22 



5«31. 3. Fast of Thebet. 23. Eosh Hodesh Shebat. 



Moon's Phases. 



Full Moon 

Last Qu 
New .Mtiou .... 
First Quarter.. 



dy. h. m. 

. G 4 17 Ev. 

.14 1 -17 Mo. 

.i{0 7 20 Ev. 

.28 8 2 Mo. 



Conjectures of the Weather. 
The 1— 3, changeable^ 4— fi, stormy and 
cold; 7— 9. snow and ruin : 10— 12, lair ; 14, 
15, If., changesfble ; 17—50, windy, cold and 
snow; 22—24, fair; 25— ;U, cold, stormy, 
show and rain. 



Be Squarely Honest. — Never try- 
dirty dodges to make money. It will 
never pay you to lick honey off of 
thorns. An honest man will not make 
a dog of himself' for the sake of a Gone, 
lie needs have a long spoon who 



would eat out of the same dish with 
Satan. Never ruin yourself for the 
sake of pelf ; it is like drowning your- 
self in a well to got a drink oi' water. 
Take nothing In hand thai imiy bring 
you repentance. 



/ 



Second Month. FEBRUARY, 1871. 



28 Days. 



Latitude of 
Southern Mtute«. 

SUN | MOON 
.rises A sets r. As. 
j li.m. 'h.rn.l h. m. 



Aspects of Planets 

And 

Other Miscellanies. 



Latitude of 
Middle Htutea. 

SUN I MOON 
rises A sets r. A s. 
h.m.i h.m.l h. m. 



1 w 




-. 


Moon'i 


o 


8igDi. 


|m. 


s. d. 



Moon 
south. 

h. m. 



W. 
T. 
F. 

S. 



1I649J5 11 
2|6 49 5 11 

3 6 485 12 

4 6 47513 



3 ! £ rises 10 h. 11 m 

4 



4 57 

5 52 



9 gr. Hel. Lat. so. R 
<$ J $ \i rises 4 h. 20. 
Q 9 sets 6 h. 2 m. 



7 


5 


3 61141 tt 20 


6 59 


5 1 


4 4 14 Us 4 


6 58 


5 2 


5 2 14!««17 


6 57 


5 3 


5 59|14W 1 



9 10 
10 2 

10 52 

11 48 



6) Septuagesima Sunday. 



Matt. 20. 



Day's length: 10 h. 8 m. 



M. 
T. 

|W. 
T. 

If. 
s. 



56 46 
6 6 45 
7,6 44 
8|6 43 
916 42 

10;6 4! 

11 640 



5 14 
5 15 
5 16 
5 17 

5 18 
5 19 
5 20 



rises'^^ia. X so. 8h. 31. 

6 41|V4y Siriusso. 9 h. 21. 

7 46. Orion so. 8 h. 24 m. 



8 35 

9 39 

10 59 

11 59 



&2 rises 3 h. 49 m. 
6$.% % rises 9 h. 49. 
11 stationary. 
Antares rises 3 h. 17. 



6 565 4 rises 141*1*16, mor. 
6 54 5 6 6 33 14l& 0il2 31 ' 
6 58 5 7 7 40 14|&15| 2 20 
6 52:5 8i 8 30 15jrH 0| 3 8 ; 
6 5115 9| 9 54115 A 151 3 58 
6 5()|5 1010 56!15!a29 4 46 ' 
6 485 12111 59|l5|v&14i 5 38 



8) Sexagesima Sunday. 



Luke 8. 



Day's length: 10 h. 26 m. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

P. 



12 6 39 

13 6 38 
14|6 37 



6 36 



5 21 
5 22 
5 23 
5 24, 



6 46 
6 45 



6 3515 25 
6 34 5 26 
6 33 5 27 



mor.l/^SS. 9 sets 6, 12. 6 47 5 13 
12 43JVL $ inVeri<ree. 

1 38| X south 7 h. 41 m. 

2 34 j 6 <f h h ris - 3, 20. w 6 4 

3 39. Andromeda sets 9, 50. 

4 44Uf^5 £ rises 5 h. 6. 

5 53|y % rises 9 h. 27 m. 



5 14 

5 15 
5 16 
6 4215 18 
6 41|5 19 

6 40|5 20 



mor. 
12 46 

1 42 

2 40 

3 44 

4 50 

5 58 



I5IHE28 6 32 
151**11 7 29 
14|&24 8 26 
14 *£ 71 9 24 
I4«X20'10'JO 
14 & 3:i0 59 
14 dkl5;li 40 



8) Quinquagesima Bunday. Luke 18. 



Day's length : 10 h. 42 m. 



S. 
M. 
T. 
W. 

It. 

F. 
S. 



6 32 1 5 28 
6 31 5 29 



6 30 

22 j 6 29 

23 6 28 

24 6 27 
25 1 6 26 



5 30 
5 31 
5 32 
5 33 
5 34 



sets. 

6 26 

7 19 

8 15 

9 9 
9 59 



B^. O enters 5 
9 sets 6 h. 24 m. 
Arctur rises 8 h. 40 m. 
Orion south 7 h. 2G m. 
g in Aphelion. 
\l rises 2 h. 49 m. 



10 39 % rises 9 h. m. 



6 35 
6 34 
6 32 
6 31 



6 39 5 21 sets.! 14! ^ 29 

6 38J5 22 6 20 14 S 10 

6 37(5 23 7 14 141x22 

5 25 8 10|14 4rt» 4 

5 26 9 4114^16 

5 28 9 59 1414^28 

5 29 10 37|l3i£* 9 



12 16 

1 6 

1 51 

2 36 

3 20 

4 4 
4 46 



0) 1. Sunday in Lent. 



Matt. 4. 



Day's length : 11 h. O m. 



S. 
M. 
T. 



6 25 
6 24 
6 23 



5 35 
5 36 
5 37 



11 561 "^ "5> in Apogee. 
mor.LP«r 6 DX 

12 50|Sirius so. 7 h. 54 m. 



6 301530 
6 28 5 32 
6 27|5 33 



1154I13IF321 
mor. I3|tf 3 
12 53|13|tf 16 



5 28 

6 10 

7 4 



6631. 6. Rosh Shanah Leaylanot. 21. 22. Rosh Hodesh Adar. 



Moon's Phases. 

dy. b. tn. 

Full Moon I 8 47 Mo. 

Lant Quarter 12 in If Mb, 

New Moon ll 8 M Mo. 

First Quart, r 27 5 HM& 



Conjectures of the Weather. 
The 1 — 4, cold and clear; F>, f>, changeable : 
7—0, cold and windy; 10—12, stormy, with 
snow; IS— l. r >,<li'ur and cold; 16— 18, cl 
able, 10, 2o. clear; 21— 23. cloudy, snow or 
rain; !4--i8, clear and cold. 



A IfVDDY stream, flowing into one 

cleaf and sparkling, for a time, rolls 

along by itself. A little farther down 

ihey unite and the whole is impure. 

•ith. untouched by sin, may for 

ort time keep its purity in foul 



company, but a little later they min- 
gle, and are one and the same, 



'Abhor all oruiltt, oh gen'roni youth, 
Ho pitiful and kind In daod and truth ; 

IC11I no living creature. -mill, 

But let Lhy tender KBRC1 reach to all." 



a. 



Third Month. 



MAECH, 1871. 



31 Days. 



. 




Latitude of 




Latitude of 


w 






3 


8 


Southern States. 


Aspects of Planets 


Middle States. 


m 


Moon's 


Moon 






SUN iMOON 


and 


SUN IMOON 


E 

IQ. 


Sign*. 


■onth. 


p 


tenses & sets' r. &s. 
' i h m.ih.raJ h. m. 


Other Miscellanies. 


rises & sets; r. & s. 
h.m.i h.m.l h. m. 


6. d. 


h. m. 



22 5 38 
21,5 39 
19J5 41 

18 5 42 



1 54j 9 sets 61i. 59 m. P* 

2 59| 6 3®Q> h rises 2, 39. 
4 O'Arctur rises 8 h. 4 m. 
4 58 Regulus south 11 h. 2. 



6 26 
6 24 
6 23 
6 22 



5 34 
5 36 
5 37 

5 38 



156 
2 59 

4 2 

5 1 



131 M 29 
12HK12 
12HK25 
12jf* 9 



7 54 

8 44 

9 39 

10 28 



lO) 2. Sunday in Lent. 



Matt. 15. 



Day's length : 11 h. 20 m. 



S 
M. 

T. 
TV. 

T. 
F. 

S. 



8|6 

96 

106 

1116 



5. 57 
rises 
J 25 

8 39 

9 51 
10 58 



0SSk Spica so. 8 h. 48. 
ig)ll. Sirius so. 7, 30. 
l2 rises 2 h. 29 m. 
□ 2/0 ^ rises 8 h. 24. 
9 sets 7 h. 21 m. 
(^ in Perigee 



5 43 
5 44 
5 45 
5 46 
5 47 
5 49, 
5 50; 11 59 Bagel sets 11 h. 12 m 



6 21) 
6 19 
6 18 
6 17 
615 
6 14 



5 40 
5 41 
5 42 
5 43 
5 45 
5 46 



6 1215 48 



6 0112 
rises 12 

7 23J11 

8 37111 

9 49 11 
10 56 11 



p*»24 
& 9 

a? 24 

iH 9 
A 24 

t«S 9 



11 59;10|vg24 



11 20 
mor. 

12 31 

1 40 

2 50 

3 42 

4 36 



11) 3. Sunday in Lent. 



Luke 11. Day's length : 11 h. 38 m. 



mor. I/O"" Regulus so. 10, 32.16 1115 49imor. 
12 48 V^«8. Or. so. 6, 14. [6 1()|5 50|12 50 

1 44|^ rises 2 h. 20 m. ^6 

2 39:^5 TVega rises 10 h. 7. 6 

3 32 g gr. Hel. Lat. So. 6 

4 25 1 9 sets 7 h. 38 m. 6 

5 712/ sets 11 h. 38 m. 6 



s. 


12 


6 9 


5 51 


M. 


13 


6 8 


5 52 


T. 


14 


^ 7 


5 53 


W. 


15 


6 615 54 


T. 


16 


6 515 55 


F. 


17 


6 315 57 


S. 


18 


6 2 


5 58 



815 52 
5 53 
5 51 
5 56 

3 5 57 



145 

2 40 

3 34 

4 26 

5 8 



* 9 
&22 
4& 5 

A 4 



528 

6 24, ^ 

7 24 

8 22 

9 20 



& 19110 10 

55 4 11 40 



Day's length : 11 h. 58 m. 



12) 4. Sunday in Lent. 



John 6. 



S. 
M. 
T. 

TV. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



6 1I5 59| 5 



6 
5 59 
5 58 
5 57 
5 56 
5 54 



sets. 



6 40 

7 43 

8 38 

9 29 
10 20 



%p2O.0ent./pfDay 
& N. eq. Spring com. 
9 sets 7 h. 49 m. 
ij rises 1 h. 28 m. 
Sirius south 6 h. 26 m. 
7* sets 10 k. 52. 



6 1 

6 
5 58 
5 57 
5 56 



5 59 



5 55 6 



5 54 6 6 



5 41 


8 


sets. 


8 


6 50 


7 


7 44 


7 


8 38 


7 


9 31 


7 


10 22 


6 



J519jll 20 
*f 2!11 52 

4HrM6|12 30 

**28| 1 12 

£2101 1 58 

£3221 2 40 

tt 3! 3 24 



13) E 


. Sunday 


in Lent. John 8. 


Day's lengtl 


1: 12 h. 16 m. 


S. 


20 


5 5316 7 


11 16 


$ in Apogee. 


5 53 


6 8 


11 18 


6 


ft 14 


4 8 


M. 


27 


5 52 6 8 


11 57 


X sets 11 h. 25 m. P\ 


5 52 


6 9 


11 49 


6 


«26 


4 56 


T. 


28 


5 51|6 9 


mor. 


^ cS $ O Superior. 


5 50 


6 10 


mor. 


5 


*& 8 


5 44 


W. 


29 


5 5016 10 


12 57 


5 49 


611 


12 55 


5 


■«21 


6 36 


T. 


30 


5 49 6 11 


152 


6DW nhO 


5 48 


6 12 


1 50 


5 


*»• 3 


7 25 


F. 


31 


5 48|6 12 


2 42 


$ Stationary. 


5 47 


6 13 


2 40 


4 


i*17 


8 18 



5631. 6. Fast of Esther. 7. 8. Purim. 23. Kosh Hodesh Nissan. 



Moon's Phases. • 

dy. h. tn. 

Full Moon 6 10 26 Ev. 

Last Quarter 13 6 10 Aft. 

New Moon f. 20 10 50 Ev. 

First Quarter 29 1 40 Mo. 



Conjectures of the "Weather. 

The 1—3, cold and windy; 5—7, cloudy, 
sometimes clear; 8—10, fair; 11—13, di's- : 
agreable; 14 — lfi, clear and cold; 17, rain 
and snow; 18, 10, agreeable; 20—22, rough 
winds, 23— 25, pleasant; 20, 27, changeable; 
28, 29, clear; 30,31, stormy; 



Gambling. — " What harm is there," 
said a young man, " in playing a game 
of cards for amusement ?" It leads to 
the formation of bad habits — gam- 
bling, drinking, swearing; and it is 
attended by loss of time, loss of health, 



loss of reputation, loss of peace, loss 
of fortune, and loss of both body and 
soul. 



It is the sma)l, unsuspected habits 
of the mind that usually control it. 



6 



Fourth Month. APEIL, 1871. 



30 Days. 






L.uiiude of ; 

Southern State*. | 

SUN MOON 

C?! rises & sets r. i h. | 

I h in. h.m. h. tn. i 



Aspects of Planets 

and 

Other "Miscellanies. 



Latitude at I en 
Afbtdle «t»te*. » 

SUN I MOON 9 
rise- .V: Hats r. .. 8. . 
h.m. h.m. li. m. m. 



Moon's 

Signs. 

8. d. 



Moon 

south. 



S. . 1,5 4!), 1) 13i 3 34 9 sets 8 h. SO m . <^ 5 45 6 15| 3 30! 4i& 2| 9 8 



14 Palm Sunday. 



Matt. 21. 



Day's length: 12 h. 32 m. 



S. 
M. 
T. 
W. 

T. 

F. 
S. 



2 5*46 14 

3 ; 5 45 15 
45 43 6 HZ 

5|5 42|a 18 
6 5 41 16 19 
7,5 40 6 20 
8[5 3$ 6 23 



4 9 t? rises 12 h. 50 m. 

4 53'^ 7$ % % so. 10 h. 50. 

5 24j^3fc % sets 11 h. m. 
rises V-S-/5. Sirius s. 10, 41 

7 39 Orion sets 11 h. 12 in. 

8 34 Aiitares rises 10 h. 54. 

9 21 $ in Perilielion. 



3 4 1 6 1 6 
5 430 17 
5 4] li 19 
5 40 6 20 
5 39:0 21 
5 37 '0 23 
5 30 6 24 



4 5, 4!&17| 9 59 



4 49 

5 20 
rises 

7 44 

8 39 

9 20 



31 A 2 10 58 
3| A 17H1 40 
3 v^ 2!mor. 
3,^17:12 36 

2 & 2\ 1 32 
2j*17l ,2 19 



15) Easter Sunday. 



Mark 16. 



S. 



41 m. 



, 915 37 23 10 18 9 sets 8 h 
M. ! 1015 30 24111 29: \ rises 12 h. 14 m. 



y 



T. ! ll;5 35 25mor. 
AY. 12:5340261229 



T. ,13,5 33 27 
F. .14 5 320 28 

S. H5:5 31i0 29 



6 Neptune Q 15 
VS. D^0 



Day's length: 12 h. 40 m. 

5~33 
5 33 
5 32 
5 31 
5 29 
5 2S 



1 28 Z' sets 10 h. 58 m. 

2 16 W!ega rises 8 h. 14 m. 

3 9 Spica south 11 h. 42 in. 5 27,0 33 3 4 ; 2 *6| 8 59 



li 25110 22] 2:*& 1| 3 17 

6 27111 31 1 U*14 4 10 

6 28 mor.| 1^27! 5 17 

6 291 12 2lil 1 &10! 6 20 

Bail 1 24, 1 &22! 7 24 

6 32 2 12 51 4 S 19 



Irt) 1. Sunday after Easter. John 20. 



Day's length: 13 h. 8 m. 



s. 


1015 30,6 30 


3 49 9 sets 9 h. 4 m 


5 26.fi 34 


3 4i PJJS28I 9 40 


M. 


1715 29 31 


4 44 % south 9 h. 50 m. 


5 25|6 35 


4 40 S Uf'io 1Q 30 


T. 


28 6 32 


5 33 Ri£vl sets h. 57 m. 


5 2#t>36 5 29| 1 <r<P21 \ 10 59 


AV. 


27 ii 33 


sets. 42j^i3£ h stationary:. 


5 22 3S sets. 


ljfc* 3 11 57 


T. 


20 


5 20 3/t 


7 44 't© ; \ rises 1 1 h. 34 m. 


5 21 


6 39J 7 50 


1 ! £3M5 12 40 


F. 


21 


5 25 6 35 


8 46 6 $ S O enters S3 


5 20 


6 40 S51 


1 »27 1 22 


S. 


22 


5 24|6 36 


9 43' 9 sets 9 h. 19 m. 


5 IS 


42| 9 49 1 fj ! 



1?) 2 Sunday after Easter. 



in Apo. 



John 10 



Day's length i 13 h. 20 m. 



El. E 



5 23 6 37 0)42 
H. 24 5 22 6 3s 1 1 40 & £ sets 7 h.- 50rit. F 
T. 25 fi 21 6 39 mor.|^ sets 10 h. 80 m. 
• 6 40 12 41 Ant:uvs rises Oil. 44 



12715 1" 

28 5 186 42 

2915 18 6 42 



1 2s ^°l<5. Spica so. 11,1. 

2 15|JP Orion sets 9h.52. 
2 40 Sirius sets Oli. 11 m. 



5 17 1)43:10 47 
5 100 -it 11 43 
5 15 6 45 hit. 
5 1 i 6 40112 39 
5 126 48 1 25 



5 U6 49i 

5 10 6 50 



2 10 

Mil 



2IH22J 

2 ; -Kl7! 
2 rf 0i 
2MIS 
3U#27 
3ife>l 



2 50 

3 38 

4 27 

5 17 

6 i 
6 54 
7-10 





is) 3. Sunday after Easter. 


Johe. 


Day's length 


13 h. 42 m. 


s 


: 




% so. 8h. :;:^n 


|5 9 6 511 


3 8i 


:5' S34 




5u31. e. 


7. Pesah, 2 first days. 12. 13. Pesah, 
21. 22. Hoih Hodesh Iyar. 


2 last days. 



Moon's Phases. 

dv. h. m. 

Full M»on S !K» Mo. 

r 12 12 B0 M-. 

M,.ou 19 1 -I All. 

27 « lo r.v. 



Conjectures of the "Weather. 

T!i" 1— n, afereeahle; 4— 6, clear.; 7— in. 
> 1 1 < • : 11—13. rainy; 11 — M. pli 

I; 19, - ■ 

s^rlng-weathef ; •_'!. •_'.">. rMi^n^enble; 2G— 2s, 
sultry; 20^ 30, cloudy, with rain! 



1 

s. 



A I ! Petition to mis Puivkk. 

— Up the hill, whip toe not ; down 

ih' bill, hurry me not ; in the stkble, 

• me not ; of bsj and corn, rob 

it : i0 clean water, siint me 

with sponge and brush, d eg led toe 
not ; of soft, dry bed, deprive me n it ; 



ifsiekor cold, chill me not ; with bit 
and reins, oh ! jerk Me not : and when 
you are angry, strike me not. 



Tiik horse i* ;i most curious feed r. 
since he eals felt when he has not a 
bit in bis mouth. 



■' 



— — 






Fifth Month. 



MAY, 1871. 



31 Days. 



Latitude of 
Southern J»tuto». 

SUN , | MOON 
rises <fe sets r. &b. 
| h.m., h.m. 1 h. m. 



Aspects of Planets 

and 

Other Miscellanies. 



Lsttiiade of 


m 


1 


Middle Slates. 


» 


Moon's 


\ Sl T N IMOON 




Signs. 


rises k sets' r. & s. 






h.m. 1 h.m. ' h. in. 


m. 


s. d. 



Moon 
south. 

h. m. 



M. 


1 


5 16 


6 44 


3 47 


T. 


2 


5 15 


6 45 


4 17 


W. 


3 


5 14 


6 46 


4 49 


T. 


4 


5 14 


6 46 


rises 


F. 


5 


5 13 


6 47 


7 52 


S. 


6 


5 12 


6 48 


8 59 



£ stationary. -FV,5 

o sets 9 h. 81 m. 5 

^2^ 6 in Perihelion. [5 
\W/4. £ stationary, j 5 
$ in Perigee. 5 

J sets 9h. 50 m. w 5 



6 52 
6 53 
6 54 

5!6 55 
4;6 56 
2f6 58 



3 40 

4 9 
4 40 
rises 

8 1 

9 10 



9 20 

10 16 

11 8 



31 A 10 
3 A 25 
3;v^ll 
3 vfi£26i mor. I 
3 «M1|12 2 
&26| 1 7 | 



19) 4. Sunday after Easter. John 16. 



Day's length: 13 h. 58m. I 



S. 

M. 
T. 
W. 
T. 

F. 

S. 



7i5 1116 49. 9 55 15 Aldebar.- sets 9, 25. ,5 Hi 59 10 5 
8 5 1016 50'10 451 c$ <S *2 h rises 10, 30. 15 7 0|10 55 
9l5 10 ! 6 50 11 40 Arctur south 11 h. G J4 597 
105 9 6 51 mor. ^Sirius sets 8 h. 34. 4 58 7 



1111 49 

2 mor. 

3 12 40 



5 8j6 52,12 451^08. Orion s. 9, 2. 14 5717 

5 7|653i 1 29:6" '9 # 9 sets 9 h. 51. 4 567 4 121 

5 6'6 54 1 "1 59 Spica south 10 h. m.|4 55|7 5 1 49 



4"M* 9; 2 10 

4 *X22l 3 21 
41 £ 5 
4tt)l8 



4 19 

5 17 

6 10 

7 21 

5124| 8 20 



s: oi 

55 12 



SO) 5. Sunday after Easter. John 16* Day's length: 14 h. 12 m. 



S. 

M. 
T. 

W. 
T. 

F. 

S. 



145 
15!5 

16|5 
17|5 
18,5 

19 5 

20 5 



5 6 55 
416 56 
3|6 57 
2|6 58 



6 58 
6 59 
6 59 



2 25 

2 50 

3 20 
346 

4 12 
sets. 
7 58 



% sets 9 h. 2G m. 
6 £ O Inferior. 
% south 7 h. 40 m. 
\ rises 9 h. 56 m. 

t». Lib. so. 10, 

"$ in Apogee. 



W. 



4 547 

4 53 7 
4 53 7 
4 52 7 

4 5117 
4 507 



14 49 7 II 



2 15 

2 40 

3 10 

3 35 

4 1 

■sets. 
8 9 



4;** 61 9 4 
4:#sr f 18| 9 40 
4!g3jf 0110 22 
4tal2il 10 
4 : £*24|U 48 
b l n 6,12 16 
4 ! t4t9i 1 S 



Si) 6. Sunday after Easter, 



John 15. 



Day's length : 14 h. 24 m. 



S. 

M. 
T. 
W. 
T. 

F. 

S. 



5 
4 59 

4 58 
4 58 
4 57 
4 57 
4 56 



8 48;& ©enters M 

9 43|(5 19 9 sets 10 h. 



R 4 487 12 j 8 59 
0.4 487 121 9 54 



10 391 6*1$ % sets 9 h. 2. 

11 38Regulus sets 12 h. 33. 
3|mor.| 9 gr. Hel. Lat. N. 

3 12 37 ^ Orion sets 8 h. 2. 

4 1 20IJ&F**. b rises 9, 26. 



4 477 13110 50 
4 46 7 14 11 46 

mor. 

12 34 
1 12 



4 461? 14 
4 45 7 15 
4 447 16 



4 •& 1 

4 : HK14 

4 '^527 
3^10 
31^23 
31* 7 
3'S?21 



1 481 

2 26 1 
316i 

4 4! 

5 

5 401 

6 21 



23) Whit Sunday. John 14. 


Day's length 


: 14 h. 34 m. 


S. 
M. 
T. 
W. 


28 4 567 4 

29 4 567 4 
3014 557 5 
3114 55 7 5 


159jl2$£ $ south 7 h. 0. 

2 36 9 sets 10 h. 14 m. 

3 5 Pollux sets 10 h. 50 m 
3 32 Arqtur 9 h. 36 m. 


4 437 17i 1 50 
l4 42|7 18 2 24 
;4 427 181 2 54 
'4 41 7 19! 3 20 


31 rH 5 

3jH20 

3;^ 5 

3VK20 


7 16 

8 6 

8 56 

9 46 



5631. 5. Pesah Shenee. 9. Lag Laomer. 21. Kosh Hodesh Sivan. 
26. 27. Shebuot. 



Moon's Phases. 

dy. h. m. 

Full Moon 4 6 2 Ev. 

Last Quarter 11 9 27 Mo. 

New Moon 19 5 49 Mo. 

First Quarter 27 8 5 Mo. 



Conjectures of the Weather. 

The 1—3, pleasant; 4, .5. rain : 0.7. cle:>.r 
and warm; 8— 10, thunder-showers; 11—!"., J 
pleasant; 14 — 16, clmntceable ; 17. IS. thun 
der-showers; 1!). 20. fair ; 21, '22, windy; •_':;—, 
25, warm; 2G — 23, cfei\r, 29 — 21, showers. 



There is nothing purer than hon- 
esty, nothing sweeter than charity, 
nothing warmer than love, nothing 
brighter than virtue, and nothing more 
steadfast than faith. These, united in 
one mind, form the purest, the sweet- 



est, the richest, the brightest, the 
holiest, and the most steadfast happi- 
ness. 



Vanity. — Our vanity is he 
stant enemy of our diguity. 



con- 



8 



Sixth Month. 



JUNE, 1871. 



30 Days. 



j Latitude of 
fgj Southern State*. 

SUN iMOON 
O rises & sets | r. & s. 



|h. 



h.m.! h. m. 



Aspects of Planets 

and 

Other Miscellanies. 



Latitude of 
Middle State*. 

SUN IMOON 
rises & sets r. & s. 
h.m. i h.m.' h. in. 



Moon's 
Signs. 



Moon 
south. 

h. m. 



T. 

F. 
S. 


1 

2 
3 


4 54j7 6 
4 5417 6 

4 53|7 7 


3 42! 9 sets 10 h. 18 m. F\ 

4 22 |^S!| H sets 8 h. 42 m. 
rises i' X*kJ 3. (^ in Per. kj 


4 4117 19 

4 40 ! 7 20 
4 40|7 20 


3 40 

4 10 

rises 


3 fr 5 10 40 
2 &18 11 42 

2 vfiJi 3 mor. 



33) Trinity Sunday. 



John 3. 



Day's length: 14 h. 42 m. 



S. 
Mi 

T. 

W. 

T. 

! F. 

is. 



4! 4 53 7 



4 52:7 

4 527 
4 51j7 



4 51 

4 51 
4 51 



7i 8 50 
81 9 40 
8 10 20 
9|ll 20 

mor. 

12 24 
1 



6 92/ 6®h 13 
1? rises 8 h. 56 m. 
Arctur south 9 h. 10 m. 
Antares south 11 h. 18. 
Wega south 1 h. 28 in. 
». 9 sets 10 h 19. 
$ gr. Elong. W. 



4 39 


4 39 


4 38 


4 38 


4 37 


4 37 


4 37 



7 21 1 9 2 
7 211 9 51 
7 22 10 31 
7 22111 26 
7 23 mor. 



7 23 
7 23 



12 22 
12 52 



21^17 
2<*29 
2|A13 
2 <&26 
1 JS 9 
1 »21 
1/^3 



148 

2 52 

3 51 

4 48 

5 38 

6 2(3 

7 8 



8-1) 1. Sunday after Trin. 



Luke 16. 



Day's length: 14 h. 43 m. 



S. 

I'M. 

IT. 

F. 

iS. 



11|4 
124 
134 

144 



50j7 10 
5017 10 
5017 10 
50,7 10 
50|7 10 
50 7 10 
SO 7 10 



1 34 1# sets 8 h. 27 m. 

2 5 gr. Hcl. Lat. S. 

2 25;Regulus sets 11 h. 20. 

2 54.' 1? rises 8h - 20m - 

3 22 d > ^ $• rises 3, 50. 
3 52 \fiJEjk H in Apogee, 
sets. I ^^2 •y. Spica s. 1, 2.^ 



4 367 24 


1 22 


1 rf 14 


4 36l7 24 


1 48 


*T2G 


4. 36 '7 24 


211 


0^8 


4 35|7 25 


241 


w 


£320 


4 35 


7 25 


3 10 


O 


« 3 


4 35 


7 25 


3 40 


< 


M15 


4 35 


7 25 


sets. 





«28 



7 58! 

8 341 

9 16! 
9 58j 

10 50 | 
1138! 



25) 2. Sunday after Trin. 



Luke 14. 



Day's length: 14 h. 50 m. 



4 49 7 11 
4 49 7 1 i 
4 49 7 11 

4 487 12 
4 49,7 11 
23J4 49 7 11 

24 4 49 7 11 



8 10 6 111 Q 2/s. 8, 11. 

9 8 Arctur South 8 h. 48. 
9 50 Antares so. 9 h. 24 m. 

10 30. ent.dflji Longest day. 

11 10 Summer commences. 
LI 50 ! 9 sets 10 h. 14 m. 
mor. jProcyon sets 7 h. 40 m. 



4 35|7 25 


8 22 


ljHEll 


4 35 7 25 


9 20 


1 »K24 


4 35:7 25 10 


1 


*# 7 


4 34!7 26;10 40 


1 


*t»20 


4 3517 25 11 20 


1 


to 4 


4 35 7 25 


11 59 


2 


a? 18 


4 35|7 25 


mor. 


2 


rH 2 



1 11 

2 

2 50 

3 38 

4 26 

5 
5 30 



2#) 3 Sunday after Trin. 



Luke 15. 



Day's length: 14 h. 50 m. 



S. 
M. 

T. 
Yv r . 
T. 
F. 



2514 507 10 12 49 



26J4 50|7 10 
27 4 50|7 10 
28|4 5017 10 
29 4 50 7 10 



1 21 

1 52 

2 22 



«5. 6 1 % 

Regulus s. 10, 22. 
Librse south 8 h. 46 m. 
(? h O h south 11, 59, 



. , , >, 2 52 Wega south 12 h. 2 m. 
|30;4 50 7 10 3 18 ! Spica sets 12 h. 6 m. ^ 



4 3517 25 
4 35 7 25 
4 3517 25 
4 35|7 25 
4 36 7 24 
4 3617 24 



12 42 

1 14 

144 

2 12 

2 42 

3 8 



2jrH16 

2;V§£ 



<«15 

*&29 
«rl4 

&28 



6 

6 48 

7 36 

8 27 

9 22 
10 24 



5631. 19. 20. Bosh Hodesh Tamooz. 



Moon's Phases, 
dy. h. 

! Full Moon 3 1 

Last Quarter 9 7 

New Moon 17 9 

First Quarter 25 5 



m. 

28 Mo. 
38 Ev. 

29 Ev. 
42 Ev. 



Conjectures of the "Weather. 

The 1, 2, thunder-showers ; 3, 4, clear; 5, 6, 
more rain; 7—9. pleasant; 10—12, warm, 
with showers; 13,14, hot; 15—17, pleasant; 
18—20, cloudy and rain ; 21—22, clear ; 23, 24, 
hot; 25, 26, sultry, with showers ; 27 — 30, hot. 



How precious is the book divine, 

By inspiration given ; 
Bright as a lamp its doctrines shine, 

To guide our souls to heaven. 
It sweetly cheers our drooping hearts, 

In this dark vale of tears : 



Life, light and joy it still imparts, 

And quells our rising fears. 
This lamp through all the tedious night 

Of life shall guide our way, 
Till we behold the clearer light 

Of an eternal day. 



it 



Seventh Month. JULY, 1871. 31 Bays. 








Latitude of 




Latitude of 1 m 


1 




*j 


£ 


Southern Stated. 


Aspects of Planets 


Middle Stwten. a 


Moon's 


Moon 








sun iMooisr 


and 


SUN |MOON J 


Signs. 


south. 




d 


p 


rises & sets r. & s. 
h.m.ih.mJ h. m. 


Other Miscellanies. 


rises & sets! r. <fc s. r 
h.rn. i h.ra. I h. in. Im. 


s. d. 


h. tn. 




8, | l|4 50j7 lOi 3 48; C in Perigee. t5 w!4 36 7 241 3 38 1 3<*11;1126 




Zt) 4. Sunday after Trin, Luke 6. Day's length: 14 h. 48 m. 




S. 


2 


4 51 


7 9 


rises :^5|S|®. 6 &h 


4 36! 7 24l rises 


4|<tfi25 


mor. 




M. 


3 


4 51 


7 9 


8 32 \\^rj in Apogee. 


4 37 7 23 


8 42 


4 A 8 


12 20 




T. 


4 


4 51 


7 9 9 IS! ^ sets 12 h. 16 m. 


4 37|7 23 


9 26 


4J&21 


1 18 




W. 


5 


4 51 


7 9 ; 9 57iRegulus sets 9h. 4")in. 


4 37 


7 23 10 5 


4iJS 4 


2 29 




T. 


6 


4 52 


7 8| 10 30'Antares south 9 h. 26. 


4 38 


7 22110 37 


4 


J517 


3 31 




F. 


7 


4 52 


7 8 11 2\6 S^ 7*riseslh. 6. 


4 38 


7 22 11 10 


4 


^29 


4 42 




S. 


8 4 527 811 44lArctursets2h. 9 m. 


4 39 


7 21111 42 5 4nMl 


5 49 




28) 5. Sunday after Trin. Luke 5. Day's length: 14 h. 42 m. 




S. 


9 


4 53 


7 7 


mor. 


/^©. 9 sets 9 h. 50. 
\^L b south 11 h. 27. 


4 39 7 21 


mor. 


5 


#?24 


6 31 




M. 


10 


4 53 


7 7 


12 18 


4 39 7 21 


12 12 


5 


S3 4 


7 12 




T. 


11 


4 54 


7 6 


12 49 


b £ O Superior. 


4 40 7 20 


12 42 


5 


Wfl6 


7 50 




W. 


12 


4 54 7 6 


116 Spica sets 11 h. 14 m. 


4 40,7 20 


1 10 


5 


£329 


8 42 




T. 


13 


4 55 7 5 


1 52 1^ in Apogee. 


4 41 7 19 


1 44 


5 


nil 


9 26 




F. 


U 


4 56]7 4 


2 22 X & w % sets 11 h. 41. 


4 427 18 


2 14 


5 


ft 23 


10 10 




S. 


15 


4 56 ! 7 4 2 49i£ Altair so. 12, 7. ^'4 42|7 18 


2 41 


6^ 6 


10 48 




29) 6. Sunday after Trin. Matt. 5. Day's length: 14 h. 34 m. 




S. 


16 


4 57 


7 3 3 20 ^i $ gr. Hel. Lat. K 4 43 


7 17 


3 11 


6 


HE19 


11 25 




M. 


17 


4 57 


7 3 


sets. 


^JSkS^. Dog days beg. 


4 44 


7 16 


sets. 


6 


$1* 3 


11 59 




T. 


18 4 58 


7 2 


8 13 


9 gr. Elong. East. 


4 45 


7 15 


8 20 


6 


t*M6.12 46 




W. 


19J4 58 


7 2 


8 5Oi<$#0 b so. 10 h. 40. 4 45|7 15 


8 56 


6 


* o 


1 37 




T. 


2014 59 


7 1 


9 19 j ? in £5 Rigelris.3, 36. 


4 46 7 14 


9 26 '6 


fcl4 


2 26 




F. 


2115 


7 


9 5216' $9 9 .sets 9 h. 18. 


4 47 


7 13 


9 59 


6 


^28 


3 11 




8. 


2215 1 


6 59 


10 22 Regulus sets 8 h. 40 m. 


4 48 


7 12 


10 29 


6 A13 


3 57 




SO) 7. Sunday after Trin. Mark 8. Day's length: 14 h. 24 m. 




S. 


2315 1 


6 59 


10 52 


6 1 £ enters n# 


4 48 


7 12 


10 59 


61 A 27 


4 44 




M. 


245 2 


6 58 


1123 


^% % sets 11 h. 2 m. 
J$J%&. Spica s. 10,25. 


4 49 


7 11 


11 28 


6 Hfcll 


5 21 




T. 


25 5 3 


6 57 


11 53 


4 50 


7 10 


11 59 


6HE25 


6 19 




W. 


26 


5 4 


6 56 


mor. 


Pollux sets 8 h. 15 m. 


4 51 


7 9 


mor. 


6 


m 9 


7 12 




T. 


27 


5 4 


6 56 


12 44 


Vl south 10 h. 6 m. 


4 52 


7 8 


12 38 


6 


*23 


8 9 




F. 


28 


5 5 


6 55 


1 25 


t3 9 sets 9 h. 4 m. 


4 53 


7 7 


1 19 


6 


<& 7 


9 10 




S. 


29 


5 6 


6 54 


2 22 


1 in Perigee. d H b 


4 53 


7 7 


2 16 


6 


*&20 


10 14 




31) 8. Sunday after Trin. Matt. 7. Day's length: 14 h. 12 m. 




S. ;30 5 7; 6 53 i 3 20 ^Wega south 9, 55. 
M. 1315 7 i 6 53!rises'Vg/«fl. Aid: r. 12, 49. 


4 54 7 6 


3 141 6 


A 4 


11 18 




4 5517 5 


rises! 6 


A17 


mor. 




5631. 6. Fast of Tamooz. 19. Eosh Hodesh Ab. 27. Tishabeab. 




Moon's Phases. 

dy. h. m. 
Full Moon ;: 2 8 32 Mo. 


Conjectures of the Weather. 




The 1 — 4, very hot; 5, 6, heat decreasing; 




Last Quarter 9 8 4 Mo. 


7— 9, thunder-showers; 10, 11, hot; 12—14, 




New Moon 17 12 21 Aft. 


cloudy, with rain; 15 — 17, clear and hot; 




First Quarter 25 12 45 Mo. 


18— 20, pleasant; 21,22, rainy; 23—25, warm; 




Fill M< 




.81 4 10 Aft 































When I take the history of one poor 
heart that has sinned and suffered, and 
represent to myself the struggles and 
temptations it has passed through, the 
brief pulsations of joy, the feverish in- 
quietude of hope and fear, the pres- 
sure of want, the desertion of friends, 



I would fain leave the erring soul of 
my fellow man with Him from whose 
hand it came. — Longftllow. 



If a man loves his neighbor as him- 
self, he will no sooner cheat or wrong- 
that neighbor than himself. 



I 



10 



Eighth Month. AUGUST, 1871. 



4 



31 Days. 






Latitude of 
Southern States. 

SUN I MOON 
rises & sets r. & s. 
| h.rn.ih.ra.l h. ra. 



Aspects of Planets 

and 

Other Miscellanies. 



Latitude of I en 
Middle fctntes. m 

SUN | MOON * 
rises & sets! r. A s. • 
h.m. i h.m. I h. in. Im. 



Moon'g 

Signs. 



Moon 
south. 



T. 


Ii5 71(5 53 


7 54 


9 sets 8 h 59 m. ^ 


4 56 7 41 8 


6 & 12 14 


W. 


215 8 6 52 


8 27 


% sets 10 h. 46 m. 


4 57 7 3l 8 33 


6JS12 


128 


T. 


3 


5 9|6 51 


8 56 


\ south 9 h. 30 m. 


4 587 2 9 1 


6 


J£25 


2 .39 


F. 


4 


5 10 6 50 


9 21 


Oriou rises 2 h. 20 m. 


4 59:7 1 


9 261 6 j? 7 


3 42 


.8. 


5 


5 116 49 


9 54 


7* rises 11 h. 6 m. 


5 017 


9 59| 6#fl9 


4 26 



32) 9. Sunday after Trin. 



Luke 16. 



Day's length: 13 h. 53 m. 



1 



s. 


6 


5 12 


6 48 


1019 


/gf^ Antares so. 7, 14. 
\L*. Altairso.10, 37. 


5 16 59 10 24 


6 £3 1 


5 10 


M. 


7 


5 13 


6 47 


10 55 


5 2 6 58H1 


5 £313 


5 50 


T. 


8 


5 13 


6 47 


11 31 


£ in n. 9 sets 8, 49. 


5 4 6 56J10 35 


5 t&2b 


6 38 


W. 


9 


5 14 6 46 mor. Sirius rises 4 h. 19 m. 


5 5 6 55 mor. 


5:« 7 


7 24 


T. 


10j5 1516 45 12 12: f in Apo. % s. 10, 36. 


5 6 6 54 


12 8 


5 M19 


8 10 


F. 


jl 5 16|6 44 


12 52' Q Wega so. 9 li. 9. F\ 


5 7 6 53 


12 48 


5i<-K 2 


8 50 


S. 


12J5 1716 43 


1 38 Fomal south 1 h. 21 m. 5 8 6 52 


134 


5JHK14 


9 31 



33) 10. Sunday after Trin. Luke 19. 


Day's 1 


ength 


: 13 h. 42 m, 


S. 


13 5 18 


6 42 


2 24j 6&2J. TJ. rises 2 h. 30. 5 9j6 51 1 2 20 


5HK27I10 14 


M. 


14 


5 19 


6 41 


3 6 


d <£# h south 8 h. 41. 


5 10 6 501 3 2 


4f*ll|l0 54 


T. 


15 


5 20 


6 40 


3 50 


^gg* Altair so. 10 h. 6. 


5 116 49 3 46 


4 jps»25|ll 34 


W. 


16 5 21 


6 39 


sets. 


W2S. Orion r. 1, 12. 5 12 6 48 


sets. 


4:1/10.12 15 


T. 


17 


5 22 


6 38 


8 2 


Sirius rises 3 h. 45 m. 


5 14 6 46 


8 6 


4l2r25| 1 8 


F. 


\S 


5 23 


6 37 


8 37 


(J |? % sets 10, 24. 
($19 9 sets 8 h. 10. 


5 15 6 45 


8 40 


4!& 91 1 56 


S. « 


>i 


5 24 


6 36 


9 8 


5 16:6 44 


9 11 


3 : A24| 2 41 


3^ 


iA 


1. Su 


ndaj 


r after 


Trm. Luke 18. 


Day's 1< 


sngth 


: 13 h. 26 m. 



S. |20 5 25 
M. 121 5 26 
T. 22 5 27 



6 35 
6 34 

6 33 



W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



23,5 28 6 32 

24 

25 

26 



gr. brilliancy. 
$% $ gr. Elong. E. 
£ sets 8 h. 16 m. 
£35. enters & 
5 29, 6 31 1 mor. \ ^ % rises 2 h. 9m.y 
5 30 6 30|12 20 6 1 h h sets 12, 48. 
5 31 6 291 1 13! 1 in Per. % sets 10, 8. 



9 37 
10 9 

10 46 

11 26 



5 17 6 431 9 41 
5 18 6 42il0 12 
5 20 6 40,10 49 
5 216 89111 29 

5 22 6 38 i mor. 
5 23,6 37 12 17 
5 24J6 36 1 10 



3.<«S 81 
3jv&22 

3!^ 6 
2 *20 

2\*& 4 
2ivoSl7| 
2 £ 01 



3 27 

4 16 

5 6 

6 4 

6 58 

7 56 

8 50 



;5) 12. Sunday after Trin. Mark. 17. 



Day's length: 13 h. 10 m. 



S. 

M. 
T. 
W. 
T. 



27 


5 32 


6 28 


28 


5 33 


6 27 


29 


5 3-1 


6 26 


30 


5 35 6 25 


31 


5 36 


6 24 



2 15 9 sets 7 h. 50 m. 15 25i6 35 

3 19 Dog days end. [5 27 6 33 

4 23 1^3^ Altair south 9, 12 '5 2W|6 32 
rises \<t)sm. Wega so. 7, 56 5 29 j 6 31 

7 38! 2/ rises 1 h. 53 m. 5 31 6 29 



2 12 
316 
4 20 
rises 



l!6U2| 9 48 
l! ^26| 10 46 
ljX 8111 40 
l|5K21imor. 



7 4l| 0!** 3J12 36 



5631. 2. Tubeab. 17. 18. Rosh Hodesh Elool. 



Moon's Phases. 

dy. h. m. 

Last Quarter 7 11 18 Ev. 

INew Muou 16 1 67 M,o. 

First Quarter 23 6 33 Mo. 

Full Moon 30 1 19 Mo. 



Conjectures of the Weather. 

The 1, 2, clear; 3, 4,.cloudy and rain ; 5 — 7, 
warm; 8, 9, changeable; 10— 12, hot; 13—15, 
thunder-showers; 10 — 18, rainy; 19 — 21, 
char and pleasant; 22. 23, cloudy, more 
rain ; 24— 2u, pleasant ; 27—31, changeable. 



It is an excellent thing when men's 
religion makes them generous, free- 
1 earted, and open-handed, scorning to 
do a thing that is paltry and sneaking. 
— Henry. 

God's word is like God's world — 



varied, very rich, very beautiful. You 
never know when you have exhausted 
all its secrets. The Bible, like, nature, 
has something for every class of mind. 
Look at the Bible in a new light, 
and straightway you see some new 
charms. 



^1 



11 



Ninth Month, SEPTEMBEB, 1871. 



30 Days. 



Latitude of 
Southern Stiites. 

SUN | MOON 
rises &setsi r. & s. 
I h.m.ih.m. 1 h. m. 



Aspects of Planets 

and 

Other Miscellanies. 



Latitude of 
Middle States. 

SUN | MOON 
rises & wets r. <fc s. 
h.m. i h.m. ' h. m. 



il Moon i 



Moon's j Mor 
Signs, south. 

s. d. h. ra. 



5 37 6 231 8 19 
5 38 6 22 8 45 



9 sets 7 h. 30 m. 
% sets 9 h. 56 m. 



^5 32 6 28 
15 33627 



8 22 
8 48 



/MP15 

mff 27 



1 32| 

2 13 * 



36) 13. Sunday after Trin. Luke 10. 



Day's length.: 12 h. 5.2 m. 



s. 


3 


5 39 


6 21 


9.11 


M. 


4 


5 40 


6 20 


9 40 


T. 


5 


5 42 


6 18 


10 13 


W. 


6i5 43 


6 17 


10 52 


T. 


7!5 44 


6 16 


M 36 


P. 


8:5 45 


6 15 


mor. 


S. 


9 


5 46 


6 14 


12 32 



9 stationary. 5 341626 

12 sets 12 h. 28 m. 5 35 j 6 25 

Spica sets 7 h. 5~. 5 37 1 6 23 
€5. Sirius r. 2, 37. .5 3816 22 
fin Apogee. Pi|5 39 j 6 21 

$ gr. Hel. Lai. S. & 5 40 ;6 20 
9 sets 6 h. 59 m. 1 5 42; 6 18 



9 14 

9 42 

10 16 

10 54 

11 38 
mor. 

12 30 



£2 9 
£321 
M 3 
ff 15 

f-f-27 
2,«£S 9 

3Us27 



3 4 

3 48 

4 30 

5 16 

6 3 

6 52 

7 40 



32) 14 Sunday after Trin. Luke 17. 



Day's length f 12 h. 34 m. 



10:5 47 6 13 1 34; 6 $ 21 11 rises 1 h. 30. |5 4316 171 1 32] 3 # 5 8 32 



6 12 
611 



UI5 48 
12|5 49 
13!5 50;6 10 
14j5 51|6 9 

15j5 52|6 8 
16 5 5316 7 



2 32: % sets 9 h. 30 m. 5 44 6 16 

3 24! £ sets 12 h. 10 m. 15 46!6 14 
Alcleb. rises 10, 6. 5 47 1 6 13 
to.: 6 D$ 5 4^16 12 

gr. Hel. Lat. S. 5 49 j 6 11 

sets 6 h. 30 m. 5 51 16 9 




2 30 

3 22 

4 14 

sets. 
7 18 
7 50 



3 tps» 19 9 21 

4 & 4 10 12 



a?48jii 1 

A 3 11 58 
A18il2 36 
vg 31 1 24 



38) 15. Sunday after Tr n. 



Matt. 6. 



Day's length: 12 h. 16 m. 



S. 17 5 54 1 6 6 8 20J 6 $ O Inferior. 



D 5516 
5 566 
5 57 6 
5 58 6 

5 59 6 

6 06 



8 5 6 \H rises 1 h. 11 m. 

9 35 \\i "§£ % sets 9 h. 10. 
10 40^ $ in Per. ft w 
115lLJ/*fl. h sets 11, 14. 
mor. ' Markab south 11 h. 2. 
12 44l0ent. A D. &N. eq. 



5 5216 8 


8 22 


5v&18 


5 53,6 7 


8 57| 6 


* 3 


5 55|fc 5 


9 36| 6 


#17 


5 56 6 4 


10 41 


6 va3& 1 


5 5816 2 


11 52 


7 


vaSU 


5 59 6 1 


mor. 


7 


^27 


6 0J6 


12 44 


7 


A 10 



2 15 

3 5 

3 56 

4 54 

5 52 

6 52 

7 51 



39) 16. Sunday after Trin. 



Luke 7. 



Day's length: 11 h. 58 m. 



2416 
256 
26! 6 
2716 
28i6 
29' 6 
306 



115 59 
215 58 
415 56 
5 ! 5 55 
615 54 
'7 5 53 
8 5 52 



1 49 

2 55 

353 

5 6i^^h Sirius rises 1 
rises|V^*8. % sets 8, 52. 

6 50| 11 rises 12 K. 49 m. 

7 16 Rigel rises 10 h. 15 m 



Autumn commences. 6 

£ stationary. 6 

0* 9 Inferior. □ T? 6 

23. 16 
6 
6 
6 



5 59 
5 57 
5 56 
5 55 
5 53 
5 52 
5 51 



1 50 

2 56 

3 59 

4 8 

rises 



^23 

SS 5 
9 X17 
91^29 

6 48 10W23J12 10 

7 imotm 5i r 21 



8 50 

9 46 

10 36 

11 24 
mor. 



5332. 



16. 17- Tishree Rosh Hashanah. 18. Fast of Guedalyah. 
25. Kipoor. 



Moon's Phases, 
dy. 1 



Last Quarter 6 

Ne.w Moon 14 

First Quarter 21 

Full Moon 28 



m. 

.11 Ev. 
13 Aft. 
19 Aft. 

5a Aft, 



Conjectures of the Weather. 

The 1—3. damp and rainy; 4, 5. pleasant ; 
6— 8. sultry; 9— 11, warm and damp; 12,13, 
pleasant; U— Ifi. cloudy and showers; 17— 
19, clear; 20—22. sultry; 23, 24, damp and 
warm; 25— 27, pleasant; 28— 30, sultry. 



When Socrates was asked why he 
had built for himself so small a house, 
he replied, " Small as it is, I wish I 
could fill it with friends " These, in- 
deed, are all that a wise man would 
desire to assemble ; for a crowd is not 
company, and faces are but a gallery 



of pictures, and talk but a tinkling 
cymbal, where there is no love. 



EVIL THOUGHT. 

Bad thought's a thief; he acts his part ; 
Creeps through the windows of the heart 
And if he once his way can win, 
He lets a hundred robbers in. 



12 





Tenth Month. OCTOBEB, 1871. 31 Days. 




! 


j Latitude of 




Latitude of 1 oa 


I 




^ 


^ Southern Slate*. 


Aspects of Planets 


Middle Stutes. | ^ 


Moon's; Moon 






• | SUN [MOON 


and 


SUN IMOONJ | 


Signs, south. 




: P 


Uj rises A sets. r. & s. 
* | h m.ih.ra.l h. m. 


Other Miscellanies. 


rises & sets! r. A s. ' 
h.m. i h.m.l h. in. !m. 


s. d. h. ra. 




j 4<l> 17. Sunday after Triii. Luke 14. Day's length: 11 h. 38 m. 




S. 1 


6 9:5 51 


7 501 9 sets 8 h. 40 m. y6 11 5 49, 7 47il0,fc3l7| 2 23 




]\1. 


2 


6 10 5 50 


8 29 5 sets 11 h. 8 m. 

9 2 8 gr. Elong. West. 


6 12 5 4S| 8 26 10^29! 3 10 




It. 


3 


6 11 


5 49 


6 13 5 47 8 59 


11|MH 358 




w. 


4.6 12 


5 48 9 41 1 9 rises 5 h. 10 m. 


6 15|5 45 1 9 39 


111 M 23 


4 42 




IT. 


5 ! 6 14 


5 46 10 29 0^ (£ in Apo. Q ^ 


6 1615 44 10 27 


ll'»ffi 5 


5 32 




\.W. 


6J6 15 


5 45 


11 26|V4^€S. Sirius r. 12, 48. 


6 17(5 43 11 24 


12iHKl8! 6 20 


J 


s. 


7|6 16 


5 44 


morJfjO prises 12, 29. j6 1915 41 


mor. 


12 ! sg» 01 7 12 


[ 41) 18. Sunday after Trin. Matt. 22. Day's length: 11 h. 20 m. 


h. 


8J6 17I5 43 


12 25 1 % sets 8 li. 19 m. 


6 20:5 40 


12 28112 p0»14| 8 2 
1 34113 i*»28 8 52 


m w. 


9 6 18 5 42 


1 31 1 Andromeda so. 11, 2. 


6 21 5 39 




T. 


1()|6 19|5 41 


2 36 


\ sets 10 h. 32 m. 


6 23;5 37 


2 39jl3.fr 121 9 30 




, W. 


11|620540 


3 56 


fj <& 9 9 rises 4, 39. 


6 24:5 36 


3 59.13ifr26.10l0 




T. 


12 6 21 5 39 


4 41 


8. gr. Hel. Lat. N. 


6 25|5 35 


4 44ll3:rHl2!l0 50 




[F. 


13 6 23 5 37 


5 15 


Jkfih £ rises 5 h. 2 m. 


6 26,5 34 


5 18 14 rh 27111 32 




ft 


14 6 2415 36 


sots. 


x4rj 2 4. 9 stationary. 


6 27J5 33 


Bets.lUIK£12|l2 26 




i 42) 19. Sunday after Trin. Matt 9. Day's length: 11 h. 2 m. 




a ii6 


6 2515 35 


6 22 11 rises 12 li. 10 m. 16 29 


5 31 


6 18,14i*4£27 


1 12 




|M. 


16 


6 26J5 34 


7 6 


> in Per. <? Nep. O 6 30 


5 30 


7 2 14 *12 


2 2 




T. 


17 


6 27 5 33 


8 4 


6 5 % o sets 7, ;8. \j 6 31 


5 29 


8 141 #26 


2 42 




jw. 


18 6 28 5 32 


9 12 £5 Altair south 6, 10. !6 32 j 5 28 


9 8|15 ! ^10 


3 41 




T. 


19,6 29 5 31 


10 20 


6 ^ k sets 10 h. 0. 16 33527 


10 16 


151^24 


4 46 




F. 


20 6 30;5 30 


1127 


^*«J*. 9 rises 4, 11.J6 35 5 25 
J^ Sirius rises 11, 53.16 36 5 24 


11 24 


15 A 7 


5 48 




S. 


2ll6 3115 29 


mor. 


mor. 


151^20 


6 45 




*3) 20. Sunday after Trin. Matt. 22. Day's length: 10 h. 44 m. 




S. 


22 6 32:5 28 12 25 


D #0 X rises 11, 50. ,6 Mb 22 12 28 


151 s: 21 7 41 1 




M. 


23 


6 33 5 27 


131 


©enters HE 16 3915 21 


1 34 


16 S14| 832| 




T. 


24 


6 34 5 26 


2 37 


D WO Orion r. 9, 24. 6 40 


5 20 


2 41 


16| S 271 9 20' 




W. 


25 


6 35 


5 25 


3 40 Kegulus rises 9 h. 38. 


6 41 


5 19 


3 44 


16 4^ 9 10 4! 




T. 


26 6 36 


5 24 


4 42 Rigel rises 9 h. 32 m. 


6 42 


5 18 


4 46 


16W21 110 54| 




F. 


27.6 37*5 23 


5 43iisgk 7* rises 6 h. 2 m. |6 44 


5 16 


5 48|16;g3 2 11 38 






2816 38 5 22 rises' V*-/ «». % sets 7, 40. 6 45 


5 15 1 rises! 16 ! fc3 14 'mor. 




44) 21. Sunday after Trin. John 4. Day's length: 10 h. 28 m. 




S. 


29 6 39,521 


6 13 9 rises 3 h. 46 m. 


6 46; 5 14 


6 18,16 PT26 


12 29 




M. 


30 


6 40 5 20 


6 57 Ih sets 9 h. 20 m. 


6 47 5 13 


7 2116 


fi 8 


1 34 




T. 


31 


6 4lj5 19 


7 40j}/ sets 11 h. 10 m. 


6 48 5 12 


7 44 16 


M20 


2 30 




563 


2. Sept. 30. and Oct. 1. Sueot, 2 first days. 6. Hoshaanah Babah. 




7. Sheminee Aseret. 8- Simhat Torah. 15. 16. Bosh Hodesh Heshvan. 




Moon's Phases. 


Conjectures of the Weather. 




dy. h. m. 


The 1—3. pleasant; 4 — 6, cloudy and rain; 




Last Quarter 6 12 41 Aft 


7 — 9, Btotmyj 10— 13, pleasant; 14, ir,. un- 
pleasant; 16 — 18, rain; 19, '20, fair, 21 22 




.New Moon 14 1 33 Mo. 




First Quarter 20 7 10 Ev. 


warm"; 2.'. — 25. changeable; 26, 2?, clear and 




Full Mr 




.28 3 :*> Mo. 


























•1 



A man who loves his home, who can 
make his own fire, black his own boots, 
curry his own wood, hoe his own gar- 
den, pay his own debts, and live with- 
out rum or tobacco, need ask no favor 
of him who rides in u coach and four. 



"Words we may control at will, 
but looks, tone, motion, and conduct, 
all of which spring from the internal 
character, compose a great reservoir of 
influence, which is ever affecting man- 
kind." 



_______ 



13 



Eleventh Month. NOVEMBER, 1871, 



30 Bays. 



4 


K 


Latitude of 
Southern States. 


Aspects of Planets 


Latitude of 
Middle States. 


03 


1 
Moon's! Moon 






SUN iMOON 


and 


SUN IMOON 




Signs, south. 


« 


O 


rises & sets r. &8. 


Other Miscellanies. 


rises & sets r. &s. 


•"■ 






| h.m.ih.in.! h. m. 




h.m. i h.m.l h. m. 


ra. 


6. d. |h. m. 



w. 

T. 
F. 

S. 



i i G 42 

26 43 

3|6 44 

4 6 45 



5 18 
5 17 
5 16 

1& 



8 37'$ in Apogee. & (^ 



9 27 
10 26 
1121 



6 $ O superior 
9 rises 3 h. 39 m. 
|6^¥ 2 r. 10, 46. 



6 5015 10 
6515 9 
6 52|5 8 

6 53 5 7 



8 29|16!^ 2 

9 19il6lHKl4 

10 18|16!HK27 

11 16il6!f^l0 



3 25 

4 14 

5 6 
5 56 



45) 22. Sunday after Trin. 



Matt. 18, Day's length : 10 h. 12 m. 



s. 


5 6 4|! 


5 15 


mor. 


M. 


6 6 4%5 14 


12 20 


T. 


716 47 


5 13 


130 


W. 


8|6 48 


5 12 


2 29 


T. 


96 59 


5 11 


3 22 


F. 


10J6 50 


5 10 


4 31 


S. 


1116 51 


5 9 


5 32 



5. % sets ? h- 28. 

T§. stationary. 
\l sets 8 h. 40 m. 
Regulus rises 8 h. 44. 
#f? ? rises 3 h. 26. 
Orion rises 8 h. 22 m. 
Sirius rises 10 li. 30 in. 



6 54;5 
6 56:5 

6 57J5 
6 5815 

6 5915 

7 0;5 



7 1|4 59 



6! mor. 16 ffl*22 
4 12 24 16 fir 6 
3| 1 3*516 a? 20 
21 2 36 16iiH 5 

3 30|16! th 20 

4 39il6.'*«S 5 

5 41 16'vaE20 



6 40 

7 2' 
81 
9 2 
9 52 I 

10 41 1 

11 35 



2f' 



46) 23. Sunday after Trin. Matt. 22. 


Day's 


length: 9 h. 56 m. 


S. 


12:6 52 5 8 


sets. 


^gjp' f) in Perigee. 


7 2-4 58 


sets. 


16j£r 5 
16*20 


12 


M. 


13 6 53 


5 7 


6 8 


7 314 57 


5 59 


12 40 


T. 


14|6 54 


5 6 


6 55 


£ in Aphelion. £3 v^ 


7 4(4 56 


6 46 


15k* 5 


1 34 


W. 


15:6 54 


5 6! 7 52 


f) d o h I sets 7, 10. 


7 5|4 55 


7 44 15 *R19 


2 36 


T. 


1616 55 5 5 


8 55 


6 % k 2/ stationary. 


7 6|4 54 


8 46 15 ^ 3 


3 40 


V. 


17 6 56 


5 4 


9 59 


9 rises 5 h. 19 m. 


7 714 53 


9 51 


15 «M6 


4 41 


s. 


1816 57 


5 3 11 5 


% rises 9 h. 53 m. 


7 8 4 52 


10 59 15 : &29 


5 38 



4J) 24. Sunday after Trin. 



Matt. 9i 



Day's length : 9 h. 42 ra. 



S. 
M~. 
T. 
W. 

T. 
F. 

S. 



6 5715 
6 58i5 
6 595 1 
22,6 5915 1 
237 015 
24 7 j|4 59 
25|7 l|4 59i 



3|11 59 
2 1 mor. 



fi». 7* so. 12 li. 7. 

Fomal so. 7 h. 8. 
Rigel rises 7 h. 47 m. 
b sets 7 h. 41 m. 

3 19 JO enters &? 

4 32 % sets 6 h. 55 m. 

5 50 1 Andromeda so. 7, 58. 



12 58 
2 4 



7 94 51 j mor.' 14' 5 11 

7 10,'4 50|12 ()|14j ^23 



7 114 49 
7 12|4 48 
7 1214 48 
7 13i4 47 
7 144 46 



1 4 14 V 5 

2 12,14 4^17 

3 28; 13*^29 

4 40!l3.«fll 

5 59!l3i£*29'll 2 



6 31 i 


7 191 


8 4l 


8 48! 


9 31! 


10 16! 



48) 25. Sunday after Trin. 



Matt. 24. 



Day's length: 9 h. 30 m. 



s. 


26 


7 2 4 58 rises rfgpvgfS. 9 r. 3 h. 17.. 7 154 45 1 rises 13, tt 5 11 42 


M. 


27 


7 2 


4 58 


5 MX§J 11 riscs 8 h - r > 9 m -! 7 lf >|4 44 1 5 30 


12|M 17112 30 


T. 


28 


7 3 


4 57 


6 21 1 ft Sirius rises 9, 28. F\ 


7 17j4 43( 6 12 


121M29 


1 20 


W. 


29i7 3 


4<57 


7 9 j@ in Apog/e. 


7 1714 43 7 HI12IHK11 


2 11 


T. 


30 


7 4 


4 56 


7 54'Arctur rises 2 h. 8 ! >m. 


7 18|4 42| 7 44 


121^24 


3 2 



5632. 14. Kosh Hodesh Kialev. 



Moon's Phases. 

dy. h. tn. ' 

Last Quarter 5 8 11 Mo. 

.New Moon 12 12 24 Aft. 

First Quarter 19 4 Mo. 

Full Moon 26 9 6 Ev. 



Conjectures of the Weather. 

The 1, 2, 3, changeable \ 4, 5. cold, ronsrh ; 
R, 7, 8, rainy; 9, 10, 11, moderate; 12. I'd, 14, 
cicar and pleasant ; lc>, 10.17, cool; IS, 19, 
cloudy and rain; 20, 21," pleasant; 22, 2."!, 24, 
I clear and dry; 2.:>— 28, cold ; 29, 30, storm v. 



The word 'heart' is named 800 j thing in the world, and yoi! shall be 

.„ :« iU ,. 11:1,1. .1. . i i i . . . , -, " , i • i • . i > i 



times in the Bible, the word 'soul ' 44 
limes, and the word 'head' only 80 
times. 



Determine that you will be some 



something. Aim at excellence, and 
excellence will be attained. This is 
the great secret of effort and emi- 
nence. I cannot do it, never accom- 
plished any tiling. I will try, has 
wrought wonders. 



r 



14 



Twelfth Month. DECEMBER, 1871. 31 Bays. 


3 


L> 


Latitude of 
Southern Stutes. 


Aspects of Planets 


Latitude of i w i i 
Middle Stiitos. ' " Moon's j Moon 






SUN .MOON 


and 


SUN (MOON 1 


Sigri3. j south. 


w 


G rises* sets' r. A s. 


Other Miscellanies. 


rises <fc sets r. <ks. r " 




• 


| h.ra. h.m. ' h. m. 




h.m.i h.m. 1 h. in. m. 


s. d. Ih. ra. 


B" 


lit 5:4 55] 8 59 


% rises 8 li. 30 m. fY 7 19; 4 41 


8 49,11';^ 6 


4 36 


S. 


2|7 6!4 54!10 10 


9 sets 6 h. 44 m. |7 19|4 4l 


9 59|10!fss»19 


5 14 | 


49) 1. Sunday in Advent. Matt. 21. Day's length: 9 h. 20 m. 


S. 


3 


7 6 4 54110 51 


\l sets 6 h. 59 m. 7 20 4 40 10 40|10i & a o o4 


M. 


4 


7 7 4 53 1127 


/^Sirius rises 8, 50. 
\L.i>. gr. Hel. Lat.S. 


7 20 


4 40 


11 19 10 5? 16 


6 40! 


IT. 


5 


7 7i4 53!mor. 


7 21 


4 39mor.| 9,i*i 


7 85 


W. 


6 7 7-14 53 


12 29 


Qgr. Elong. West. 


7 21 


4 39,12 361 9: A 14 


8 48! 


li- 


7<7 814 52 


1 50 Orion rises 6 li. 28 m. 


7 22 


4 38 1 58 8:&29 


9 581 


lt' 


8 7 8 4 52. 


3 7|rf f? 9 rises 3, 20. 


7 22 


4 38 319 8*fel4'll 51 


||. 


9 7 814 52 


4 12! 7* south 10 h. 36 m. 


7 23 


4 37! 4 231 8mS28!ll 57 


5«) 2. Sunday in Advent. Luke 21. Day's length: 9 h. 14 m. 


S. 110 


7 8 


4 52' 5 18 


,#^2/ rises 7h. 51 m. 7 23|4 37 


5 30 


7, &14 


12 25 


iM. Ill 


7 9 


4 51 sets. 


Wn bN?3 ^ 


7 23 4 37 


sets. 


7 #28 


1 18 


IT. 12 


7 9 


4 51 


5 28 


"$ in Perigee. 


7 24|4 36 


5 15 


6,^13 


159! 


W. 


13 


7 94 51 


6 27 


"1 6* ^ £ *? sets 6, 0. 


7 2414 36 


6 16 


6 *£26 


2 45' 


T. 


14 


7 9 4 51 


7 31 


9 in Perihelion. 


7 24J4 36 


7 20 


5|&11 


3 37, 


F. 


15 


7 10 4 50 


8 38 


8 gr. Elong. East. 


7 2414 36 


8 26 


5'& 24 


4 26:| 


S. 


16 


7 1014 50 


9 41 


8 sets 6 h. m. 


7 254 35 9 31 


4 SS 7 


5 16! 


51) 3. Sunday in Advent. Matt. 11. Day's length: 9 h. 10 m. j 


S. 


[17 7 10j4 50|10 48 


^9 rises 3, 27. 
JPgfc. prises 7, 2. 


7 2514 35 


10 38 


4 i 55520 


6 11)1 


M. 


18 


7 10i'4 50 11 49 


7 25 4 35' 


1140 


3'fpf 2 


7 2! 


T. 


19 


7 ll|4 49mor. 


Wega sets 9 li. 27 m. 


7 25|4 35 


mor. 


3^13 


8 4! 


W. 


20 


7 1114 49 


12 40 


Regulus rises 9, 23. 7 25 


4 35 


12 48 


2^/25 


9111 


T. 


21 


7 1114 49 


1 42 Sinus rises 7 li. 30 m. 


7 25 


4 35 


1 50 


2:^8 


10 20; 


F. 


22 


7 1214 48 


2 44 |0ent.vaR shortest day. 


7 26 


4 34 


2 56 


l,fc?19 


11 23 i 


S. 


23 


7 11|4 49 


3 47 1 Winter commences. 


7 25 4 35 


3 59 VM 1 


12 1 


52) 4. Sunday 


in Advent. John 1. Day's length : 9 h. 10 in. | 


S. 


24|7 11 4 49 


4 58, Orion rises 5 li. 10 m. ,7 26j4 351 5 10 i; tf YZ 


12 42 


M. 


25,7 11 


4 49 


6 12 4S&& 9 rises 8, 31. Fr7 25j4 35 6 24 
rises iv4y2*ft. '$in Apo. 7 25 1 4 35 rises 


| ttg 


1 22! 


T. 


26 7 10 


4 50 


• hk 7 


2 1 


W. 


27|7 10 


4 50 


5 47 .7* south 9 h. 17m. |7 25i4 35; 5 35 


I4bi9 


2 40 1 


T. 


28 7 10 


450 


6 491 ~$ 6 h # H rises C, 29. 7 25|4 35| 6 39 


2'f* 3 


3 14 


F. 


29 7 10 


4 50 


7 53jRigel south lOh. 36m.!7 2514 35 7 42 


2.^151 3 46 


S. 


30 ! 7 9 


4 51 


8 59! % in Perihelion. 1 7 24 4 B6I 8 50 3 ^29' 4 26 


53) Sunday after Christmas. Luke 2. Day's length: 


9 h. 12 ra. 


S. |31 7 94 51 110 8,0 in Perigee. 17 24(4 36! 9 5B» 3 frift 45»| 


5632. 5. Barech Alenu. 8. Hanucah, 1. day. 13. Rosh Hodesh Tebet. 


22 Fast of Tebet. 


Moon's Phases. 


Conjectures of the Weather. 


dy. h. m. 


The 1, 2, clear and cold: :;, 1. change- i 


Finl Moon 5 1 54 Mo. 


able; 5, 6. 7. rough winds: 8, 9, pleasant: 






11 11 7 Ev. 
18 3 44 Aft. 


10. 11. cold; 12, 13, rain or snow: 11. Lfr.clear 
and pleasant; lrt, 17, changeable; 18,19.20, i 
fair; 21,22. windv; 2:5. 2-1. 2.1, cool and pleas- ' 












First Quarter 28 4 R8 Ev. ant; 26,27, cloudy: 28. 2'J cold, 30, ;;i. rain. 






A RICH man would be ashamed of A urn .of duty is the only cheerful 
himself if a poor beggar-boy should life — for all joy springs from the afTcc- 
claim such a relationship as the mean- tions ; and it is the great law of nature, 
est Christian may claim to (iod. O that without good deeds all good aftVc- 
what a mercy it is to be enabled to say, tion dies, and the heart becomes utterly 
" Our Father who art in heaven." 1 desolate. 



15 



Preface. 

Almanacs having become a house- 
hold necessity, their pages afford a val- 
uable medium for disseminating whole- 
some instruction to every family 
throughout the land. The publisher 
being aware of this fact, and from the 
conviction that it is the duty' of the 
Christian, not only to improve the op- 
portunities presented, but even to seek 
after occasions for doing good, has 
resolved to publish an annual pamph- 
let to be called the Brethren's Al- 
manac, of which this is the first issue. 
It will Impart all the information usually 
expected in such works. The reading 
matter will be such as will be thought 
most useful to, and acceptable with its 
patrons. The present edition, has been 
somewhat hastily, compiled, yet it is 
hoped it may be generally acceptable. 



What the Brethren Preach. 

They preach that there is one God, 
who is omnipotent, omniscient, and 
omnipresent : the creator of all things, 
" And hath made of one blood all na- 
tions of men, for to dwell on the face 
of the earth I" They preach that He 
is a just and merciful God ; too wise to 
err, too good and kind to do injustice. 
" He that fearoth Him and worketh 
righteousness is accepted." They 
preach that he created man in his own 
image and likeness, endowed him with 
faculties to decide between right and 
wrong, to choose life and escape 
death ; in short, a free, moral agent. 
That He gave to man a law as a test 
of his obedience ; that by disobeying 
that law, he became sinful, carnal, and 
mortal ; was driven out of the garden 
of Eden ; deprived of access unto the 
tree of life ; had a just sentence in- 
flicted upon him, embracing all the ills, 
pains, and sufferings which flesh is 
heir to ; that in administering justice 
to the guilty parties, the divine attri- 
bute of meicy shines forth prominently 
in the premise of a "Savior" which 
grew brighter throughout the Pairi- 
archal dispensation by renewed prom- 
ises until the time of the Levitical 



Law, when God typified by rites and 
ceremonies, offerings and sacrifices, 
figures and prophetic visions, the im- 
port of that promise which at the end 
of that dispensation was Fulfilled, in 
this that the " Word " (which was in 
the beginning) was made flesh, in the 
person of Jesus Christ. 

They preach also, that there i* one 
mediator between God and man — " The 
man Christ Jesus ; that he was born 
of a woman, took on himself flesh and 
bood, suffered in our stead ; wa^ made 
perfect through suffering, and Hereby 
obtained a name which is above every 
name, — all power in heaven and upon 
earth, — destroyed him that had the 
power of death ; delivered us from the 
power of darkness ; removed the cher- • 
ubim, opened the sealed book, entered 
the holy place, not made with hands, 
with his own blood ; obtained eternal 
redemption; is seated at the right 
hand of the Father, and "Is the true 
God, and eternal life.^ 

They preach that Jesus Christ is 
the only Savior, His gospel the only 
plan of salvation, His commands the 
only means of salvation ; that the Gos- 
pel reveals to man his sinful and help- 
less condition, his relationship to God, 
and his duties towards Him. They 
preach that Christ reconciled the world - 
unto God; that "where no law is 
there is no transgression ;" that " the 
first command with promise, is to 
honor father and mother ;" that chil- 
dren stand reconciled, before obtaining 
a knowledge of right and wrong ; that 
Christ did promise to such " the king- 
dom of heaven ;" that " To him that 
knoweth to do good and doeth it not, 
to him it is sin ; that the Gospel en- 
lightens, showing man his depraved 
condition, pointing him to God as an 
avenger and revvarder, to Christ as the 
only Savior, to the Holy Ghost as 
the Convietor, Reprover, Comforter, 
and Sanctifier; that no one conies to 
the Son unless drawn by the Father, 
and that no mancometh unto the Father 
but by the Son. That in the gospel 
are revealed all things pertaining to 
life and godliness ; that the preached 



/. 



16 



word is designed to enlighten the un- 
derstanding, to lead the sinner to seek 
pardon, the conditions of which are : 
Faith, Repentance, arid Baptism. They 
preach 'that to repentance belongs sor- 
row for sin, restitution for wrongs 
committed, confession of sins to God 
and man, ceasing to do evil, a desire 
to do good, resulting in a complete 
change of mind ; and that faith accom- 
panies repentance as inseparably con- 
nected ; .growing stronger as the sub- 
ject progresses, until it becomes the 
faith that works by love ; believing all 
things written in the law and in the 
prophets ; that baptism following those 
prerequisites is the bath of regenera- 
tion, the answer of a good conscience, 
the putting on Christ, and the being 
buried by baptism with him. They also 
preach that baptism properly means 
immersion, that it demands a three- 
fold action to fill the commission ; that 
laying on of hands is connected there- 
with ; that remission of sins accompa- 
nies, and that the gift of the Holy 
Ghost, by which believers " are sealed 
unto the day of redemption," follows 
it. That such have been " born of 
water and of the spirit," that they have 
entered through Christ the door, taken 
his yoke upon them, have put on 
Christ, and are new creatures, which 
is confirmed by continued willingness 
to observe all things, among which are 
self-denial of all ungodliness and 
worldly lust, not resisting evil, not 
avenging themselves, not minding 
high things, but learning from the 
Master meekness and lowliness of 
heart: walking in all the commands 
and ordinances blameless. Among 
these they mention feet washing, the 
Lord's supper, the communion, the kiss 
of charity, anointing the sick with oil 
in the name of the Lord: diligently 
following every good work. 

They preach that Jesus Christ is 
appointed universal judge; that He 
will judge the world in righteousness, 
reward every one according to his 
works ; that the gospel is the code of 
laws by which those living under its 
dispensation will be judged. " The 



word that I have spoken, shall judge 
him in the last day." 



Waterloo Congregation. 

The above is the congregation that 
held the Annual Meeting in 18*10, and 
has the honor of having entertained 
the first meeting of the kind west of 
the Mississippi river. It has an ex- 
cellent meeting-house, forty by eighty 
feet, with basement under the entire 
house. It is estimated to have cost 
about $6,000. There are about two 
hundred members in the congregation, 
and they have eleven ministers and 
fifteen deacons. It was organized in 
1858, by Elder John Berkley, with 
John H. Filmore, a minister, and an 
election of. John Spicher to the min- 
istry, and Martin Buechley, deacon. 
They now hold meetings every Lord's 
Day, and not unfrequently at two or 
three different places at the same time. 



fleivspaper Extract. 

The following is from a Goshen, In- 
diana, secular newspaper: 

Goshen, Monday, May 31, 1852. 
Mr. Editor : — Yesterday, for the 
first time, 1 had the pleasure of at- 
tending the annual meeting of the Re- 
ligious Society of Brothers, or as they 
are more commonly called the Hun- 
kers. The meeting was held at Wy- 
land's Mills in this county, five miles 
south of Goshen. The selection of 
the place was a wise one, beyond 
doubt, it being situated upon the Elk- 
hart river, almost surrounded by groves 
of timber, which at this delightful 
season of the year served man and 
beast with such a shelter from the heat 
of the sun as no man can ever build. 
The large house of Mr. Wyhind and 
his still larger barn and out-house, 
were all throwij open for the use of 
the meeting and the friends and bro- 
thers from a distance. I avrived upon 
the ground at about ten in the morn- 
ing, and found assembled the largest 
concourse of people that I ever saw at 
any religious meeting ; many had come 



I*> 



17 



do doubt from motives of curiosity and 
sight-seeing ; yet to my mind it is one 
of the most sublime scenes that a man 
can witness, to see so large a number 
of people assembled in one meeting, the 
sole and true purpose of many and the 
ostensible purpose of all being the wor- 
ship of the one and only God. Al- 
though I was comparatively a stranger 
to their religious opinions and cere- 
monies, yet I must acknowledge that 
the sight of so many apparently devout 
and unassuming members, led on by 
the example of the gray headed fathers 
among them, all so plainly dressed, 
with their long beards helping to mark 
the whole external man with an air of 
dignity and devotion, with their hearts 
turned to God in thanksgiving and 
prayer, awakened a feeling in my own 
breast that I shall never forget. There 
was preaching during the greater part 
of the day, from three different places, 
both in English and German. At the 
close of the forenoon services nineteen 
persons were baptized as new members 
of the church. The council meeting 
of the members for the transaction of 
church business I understand will com- 
mence on Tuesday, and the meeting 
will, probably close on Wednesday or 
Thursday. 

There are a large number of preach- 
ers present, say two hundred or more, 
and must have been as many as ten or 
twelve thousand persons in attendance 
on the ground on Sunday. Twelve 
or thirteen States of this Union have 
been fairly and some very largely re- 
presented at this meeting. I understand 
that their annual meeting was held 
in Ohio in 1850, in Virginia last 
year, and will probably be held in 
Maryland next year. The meeting 
thus' far has passed off without any 
disturbance or accident to mar the 
feeling of any. Indeed the season and 
the day, the place and the cause, must 
have all conspired to arouse every 
heart from the contemplation of evil to 
a just sense of the good and the beau- 
tiful. I listened to as much as I could 
hear of one discourse with great plea- 
sure and* satisfaction. I did not learn 



the speaker's name, but his sentiments 
were those of the true Christian, who 
without any parade or show wishes to 
impress upon the hearts of his hearers, 
the necessity of humility and brotherly 
love towards all and under all circum- 
stances. This religion consists not 
more of words than deeds, and I will 
venture from what I know of their 
practices that you never have nor ever 
will know a poor person in their church 
who is left by them unprovided for. 
To my mind such acts, so constantly 
manifested, are a better proof of true 
religion than all the ostentation and 
show with which many churches 
abound. All in ail, it has been the 
greatest meeting ever held in this part 
of the country, and such an one as we 
may never look upon its like again, and 
all who failed to attend it, have lost 
largely by their neglect. 

Yours, truly, 

J. H. M. 



Biographical Department, 

ALEXANDER MACK. 

Alexander Mack, the first minister 
among the Brethren, was born in 1679, 
in Schreisheim, in the electoral of 
Palatia, or Chur-Pfalz, between" Man- 
heim and Heidelberg, in Germany. v 
He was an educated Presbyterian of, 
the Calvinistic faith, and by occupa- 
tion a miller. In 1700 he married a 
very worthy woman of about his own 
age, and a native of the same place, 
by the name of Anna Margaretta 
Klingin, with whom he had five 
children, three sons and two daughters. 
Their names were Johan Valentine, 
Johannes Alexander, Christina, and 
Anna Maria. The daughters both 
died young ; but there is a number of 
his descendants still living, and in 
membership with the Christian com- 
munity with which their worthy ances- 
tor was the happy instrument in the 
hands of God to organize and estab- 
lish. Elder John Fox, of the Phila- 
delphia church, and Elder Jacob Mack, 
of Fayette county, Pa., are great grand- 
sons of his. The Holsinger family of 



t ' $ 



18 



Bedford county, Pa., of which there is 
a number of worthy ministers, are 
also descendants of his, besides many 
others in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and 
Ohio. 

He became convinced, by his read- 
ing of the Scriptures, that an immersion 
in water was the New Testament Bap- 
tism, and a believer the only proper 
subject for the ordinance. Accord- 
ingly, he, and has wife, and six others 
were immersed in the river iEder, in 
the year 1708, and covenanted to- 
gether to walk in all the command- 
ments and ordinances of the lord, ac- 
cording to their knowledge of his word. 

Thus was the first church of the 
Brethren organized, and Alexander 
Mack chosen as their Elder* or offi- 
ciating minister. His labors were 
crowned with so much success, that in 
a short time a number of churches 
were established in the surrounding 
country, which gave occasion to a 
great deal of fiery persecution, which 
obliged the believers to flee from place 
to place for safety. Alexander Mack 
was rich,^but out of love to his brethren 
he became poor, for the cruel hand 
of persecution frequently arrested the 
brethren, and shut them up in loath- 
some prisons. To procure their 
liberty, he would pay the fines which 
the authorities required of them, which 
were sometimes so enormous that his 
handsome patrimony of several fine 
vineyards, and a very profitable mill, 
were soon taken from him. 

He emigrated to America in 1729, 
at the head of a large company of his 
persecuted brethren, and settled as a 
poor man in this world's goods, but 
rich in faith, on a small lot of ground 
near Germ an town, and assisted Peter 
Becker (who 'came over ten years 
before) in ministering the word to the 
church at Germantown. 



* He had been a minister already before, this 
election took x>Iace, with the celebrated Ernst 
Christople Hochman, the author of the Berlin- 
burger Bible, with whom he had co-operated 
for some time, and also accompanied him in 
his several religious visits through Germany, 
Switzerland, and elsewhere, but left him for 
the 6ake of a stricter obedience to the truth. 



He, however, did not live long to 
enjoy the quietude of a home under 
the mild government of Pennsylvania, 
for on the 19th of January, 1735, six 
years after he came to America, he 
closed his labors on earth. He was at 
first buried in the public burying 
ground of Germantown, as the' Brethren 
had none of their own at that time. 
His remains were afterwards removed 
to that of the Brethren's, and the fol- 
lowing brief inscription in the German 
language marks the place : 

''Here rest the remains of A. M., 
born 1679, and died 1735; aged 56 
years." 

ALEXANDER MACK, JR., 

Was born of the«above-named parents, 
at Schwartzenau, in the province of 
Witgenstein, Germany, on the 28th 
of January, 1712, and was baptized' and 
became a member of the mother chur'ch 
at Schwartzenau, in 1728, w 7 hen but 
sixteen years of age ; came to America 
with his parents in the autumn of 
1729; was called to the ministry on 
the first day of June, 1748, and on the 
10th day of June, 1753, he was ad- 
vanced to the office of Bishop by the 
imposition of hands, at which time the 
care of the church at Germantown was 
publicly laid upon him. 

On the 1st of January, 1749, he 
married Elizabeth Nice, of German- 
town, by whom he had one son, WiU 
liam, and five daughters, to wit: 
Sarah Margaretha, who married Jacob 
Ziegler; Hannah, to Adam Weber; 
Lydia, to Dilman Koib, and Jacob 
Lentz ; Elizabeth died young; Anna 
Margaretha, to Emanuel Eox, the 
father of Elder John Fox, of Philadel- 
phia, who have raised him a great 
number of grand and great-grandchil- 
dren dispersed through diilereni States 
of the Union. 

As regards his character, he is 
represented as a sincere, good man; 
much given to retirement; by occu- 
pation a stocking weaver. And as his 
worldly possessions were but small, so 
his wants were but few, which made 
his contentment, equally compiete. 



r 



* -v 



19 



In life public preaching, it is said he 
did not manifest much oratory, but 
with the pen he was very ready and 
fluent. He had a particular talent for 
poetry, as many hundreds of his verses 
and poetic stanzas still exhibit. He 
possessed a remarkable degree of 
sagacity and discernment, so that no 
art could ensnare him, or hypocrisy 
beguile him. He died on the 20th of 
March, 1803, at the advanced age of 
91 years, 1 month, and 20 days. 

During his brief sickness, be was 
visited by a number of his fellow 
laborers, whom he admonished very 
feelingly to be faithful in the discharge 
of their various duties, and grieved 
over the several deviations which were 
then creeping into use. Especially in 
that of Feet-washing, which distressed 
him so much that he charged them, 
with his fast expiring breath, to be 
faithful to the pattern which Christ 
* gave us. His last words were : '■ Nun 
reisz ich gegen Morgen, wer mit will 
der mache sich eilencls fertig." 

Although he was as well j r et as 
usual, he had a strange presentiment 
of his dissolution being near. He 
therefore composed the following epi- 
taph for his grave stone, which he gave 
to his daughter Anna Fox, telling her 
that his departure was at hand now, 
and that this was his last visit to her, 
as it also proved to be. The epitaph 
may yet be seen on his tomb-stone in 
the Brethren's grave-yard, in German- 
town, in the following words: 

Gott ! der uns hat aus staub n-emaebt, 
Unci wiedermn — Zu staub ^ebracbt, 
Wird zeugen seiner W'eisheit-macht, 
Wanu wir naeb seinem bild erwaclit. 



PETER BECKER. 

Feter Becker, the first minister of 
the Brethren in America, was born at 
Dillsheim, in Germany, in the year 
ln'87. He was brought up and edu- 
cated in the Fresbyterian faith, but em- 
braced the principles of the Brethren 
at Creyfeldt in ITU, immigrated to 
America at the head of the first com- 
pany of Brethren that crossed the 



ocean in 1719, and settled near Ger- 
mantown on his little farm of twenty- 
four acres, which he tilled with his 
own hands, and followed his occupa- 
tion (weaving) besides, until .October 
14th, 1746, when lonesomeness and the 
infirmities of age prevailed on him to 
retire. He made vendue, and sold , 
both his real and personal property, 
and moved to his son-in-law, Rudolph 
Harley, (the writer's grandfather,) at 
Indian Creek, Montgomery county, 
where he lived until the day of his 
death, which occurred on the 1 9th of 
March, 1 758. He is buried in the 
family burying ground, about one and 
a half miles from Indian Creek. He 
was married to Dorothy Partman, a 
very pious and worthy woman, with 
whom he had two daughters only, 
Mary and Elizabeth. The former 
married the above-named Rudolph 
Harley, and the latter married Peter 
Stump, who raised fifteen children. 

He appears to have been a man of 
ardent feelings and considerable talent, 
accompanied with great zeal in the 
service of his Master, in so much that 
he was the happy instrument in organ- 
izing most all the early churches of 
the Brethren in America. 

JVluch more might be said of him ; 
but whatever his real character was, 
this may confidently be asserted: That 
he traveled more, and labored more 
abundantly in the cause of the church 
than all his contemporaries. 

CHRISTOPHER SAUR, Or^SOWER, 

whose checkered life was so eventful, 
and the vicissitudes through which his 
faith and fortune were obliged to pass, 
were so many and so great, especially 
during the trying period of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, when his immense 
property was all confiscated, his family / 
scattered, his children beggared, and 
himself imprisoned and so shamefully 
abused that a detail thereof would fill 
a volume of itself, that I shall give but 
a very brief notice of him. 

He was born on the 2'ith of Septem- 
ber, 1721, at Laasphe, in the Province 



20 



of Wit gen stein, Germany. ' He was 
the only child of his father, who was 
a highly educated gentleman of the 
same name, with whom he came to this 
country in the autumn of 1724, and 
was baptized to the faith of the 
Brethren, in February, 1737, when 
only a little over fifteen years of age ; 
commenced his hermitage in 1743, 
and continued it till April, 1751, when 
he was united to sister Catharine 
Sharpneck, with whom he had six sons 
and three daughters. Their names 
were Christiana, Christopher, Daniel, 
Samuel, Peter, Catharine, Esther, 
David and Samuel, (the first Samuel 
died young.) 

He was chosen to the office of Over- 
seer of the Poor (Armen Wiener) in 
May, 1747; to the Ministry in June, 
1748, and ordained on the 10th of 
June, 1753, at which time he and 
Alexander Mack had the entire care of 
the church devolving upon them. 

Multifarious as his secular engage- 
ments were,* he yet found time suf- 
ficient to write, to preach, and to travel 
a great deal. 

It might truly be said of him — he 
was instant in season and out of season 
— was diligent in business — fervent in 
spirit — serving the Lord. And as 
heaven had blest him with a strong 
mind and an athletic constitution, his 
labors were, therefore, more abundant 
in the vineyard of his Lord than those 
of any of his ^contemporaries. Until 
his release by death, which occurred on 
the 2Gth of August, 1784, when he 
entered (a$ we trust) into that rest 
which remaineth for the people of God, 
aged sixty -three years and eleven 
months. He is buried in the old 
Mennonites' grave-yard on Metatchey, 
about six miles northwest from Norris- 
town. 

The following is a copy of the epi- 
taph on his grave-stone, said to be 
composed by himself not long before 
his decease : 



* It is said that aa many as twenty-four 
different trades and occupations were carried 
on under Lis superintendence. 



" Death, thou hast conquered me^ 
'Twas by thy dart I'm slain; 
But Christ shall conquer thee, 
And I shall rise again. 

Time hastens on the hour, 
The just shall rise and sing: 

0! Grave, where is thy power? 
! Death, where is thy sting ?" 

A. IL Casseli.. 



Hemarlcs upon Courts, 

The following is translated from the 
''High German American Almanac," 
for the year 1760, published by Chris- 
topher Saur, and was written by him 
as a preface to the List of Courts to 
be held in the different States and 
Territories. 

Inasmuch as through the fall of man 
everything became so desperately cor- 
rupt, that men Will no longer be 
governed by the Spirit of God, (which 
is a spirit of love and peace,) but are 
continually bent upon defrauding and 
deceiving one another, exercising in- 
justice, withholding just dues, and even 
destroying one another's lives, as it is 
daily witnessed, therefore, God, in the 
wisdom of his counsel, thought it good 
to appoint governments, and into their 
hands has delivered the sword for the 
punishment of the evil doer, and the 
protection of the good. See Rom. 13. 
And where a government answers these 
designs of God, there it is right for 
believers to be subject to such govern- 
ment as the apostle commands in the 
same chapter. The token by which 
such a government may be known, to 
which such obedience is due, is also 
set forth by the apostle in the 3d verse 
of the 13th chapter: " For rulers are 
not a terror to good works, but to the 
evil. Wilt thou then not be afraid of 
the powers ? Do that which is good, 
and thou shalt have praise of the 
same." Now where a government is 
thus administered, so that the pious 
receive its protection aud praise, which 
never transcends the limits of the 
Divine law, nor attempts to exercise 
authority over the consciences or re- 
ligious views of its subjects, unless 
acts deserving of punishment should 
be committed, ever seeking to maintain 
peace and union; bearing the sword, 
but compelling no one to use it against 



• « 



21 



his conscience ; he that resisteth such 
a government, "resisteth the ordinance 
of God. And they that resist shall 
receive to themselves damnation." 

Should, however, a government not 
be constituted according to God's or- 
dinance, hating and envying the just, 
praising and protecting the evil, ex- 
ercising authority over the consciences 
of men, imposing on them unchristian 
deeds, and the carnal sword, (which 
Christ has commanded to be put into 
the sheath,) to be subject to such a 
government, would be nothing else 
than rejecting t^e master and obeying 
the servant; to such Peter and John 
replied without a violation *of con- 
science, (Acts 4: 19:) "Whether it 
be right in the sight of God, to hearken 
unto you more than unto God, judge 
ye." 

According to the original text of 
Hebrews 11 : 3, it reads: "Through 
faith we know that the things which 
we see, became of the things which we 
do not see." Hence all visible things, 
whether good or evil, are an offspring, 
or antetype from the powers of light 
or darkness, and are swayed by them. 
So also governments established ac- 
cording to divine appointment, together 
with their ministrations, are typical of 
the judicature of Christ and his saints 
at that great day when all shall be 
judged in righteousness, at which great 
court, or judgment day shall appear, 
not only all men, as Paul says ; (2 Cor. 
5 : 10 ;) 'but even angels themselves 
shall be judged. 1 Cor. 6 : 3. 

And as Christ the true head of all 
believers humbled himself before he 
ascended, suffered before he reigned, 
was condemned and put to death before 
he comes to judge; did not appeal to 
secular powers for protection or redress 
when upbraided as Beelzebub or prince 
of devils; "reviled not when he was 
reviled, and when he suffered he 
threatened not, but committed all unto 
Him who judgeth righteously;" hence 
the true followers of that blessed head 
are contented not to "judge before the 
time," gladly leaving over this minis- 
tration to its servants and allowing 



them to represent the figure, but theyi 
themselves the substance ; and where 
the servants, or as they are termed in 
Rom. 13: 4, the "ministers of God," 
rule well, there the children will also 
rejoice together. 

We are therefore under obligations 
to thank God, that here in Pennsyl- 
vania we have such authorities that 
grant and protect liberty of conscience 
and have on several occasions bravely 
defended those liberties when we were 
in danger of losing them, for which 
God will certainly be their rewarcler. 
But that many acts of injustice and 
violence are perpetrated, against the 
advice of the authorities, not only by 
ungodly citizens, but by under officials, 
who love bribes, and pervert right, al- 
most daily experience teaches. It 
would indeed be desirable that men 
would accept the advice of Christ and 
his apostles, rather to suffer than to 
contend at law. "And if any man 
will sue thee at law and take away thy 
coat, let him have thy cloak also." 
" Dearly beloved, avenge not your- 
selves, but rather give place unto 
wrath : for it is written, vengeance is 
nyne ; I will repay, saith the Lord." 
Rom. 12 : 19. And whosoever suffer- 
eth wrong for Christ's sake, hath the 
promise of receiving "an hundred fold 
again." Matt. 19 : 29. 

Should, however, the objector say, 
" my faith is' too weak for these things, 
and for such things no one is prepared 
without faith ; and if we do not appeal 
to the civil authorities and make use of 
the law, which is ordained of God and 
designed for our benefit, we are in 
danger of being wronged out of what 
is justly our own ; and circumstances 
differ widely and cannot all be mea- 
sured by the same rule," &c, then I 
answer : ti is well spoken, for here- 
unto faith is demanded, for without 
faith these things cannot be fulfilled ; 
but is not faith required in the per- 
formance of every Christian duty ? For 
"That which is without faith is sin." 
Rom. 14 : 23. And the fear of suffer- 
ing the loss of goods by honoring the 
doctrine of Christ, and exercising him- 



22 



self in eodlinefcs, cannot possess him 
that has faith, for ne knoweth that 
-without the permission of God neither 
men nor the devil have power to harm 
him, and should God permit it he is 
content that His will shall he done, 
knowing; that it will work for our 
good : for "godliness is profitable unto 
all things, having promise of 'the 
life that now is and that which is to 
come." 1 Tim. 4:8. 

As to circumstances being so diver- 
sified that all may not he squared by 
the same rule, I partly admit, yet no 
circumstance is so extraordinary that 
by faith we may not meet the appro- 
bation of God. But this I say, and 
will prove it by the Scriptures, that it 
is a great shame for professors of 
Christianity, and members of the same 
church, to sue one a not her at law be- 
fore the civil authorities, for they 
thereby plainly manifest that their 
teachers and superintendents, and 
deacons, and in fact their whole so- 
ciety are destitute of that wisdom 
which (pialif.es men to decide in worldly 
matters, as Paul says, 1 Cor. 6 : 5-7, 
which read carefully. 

Such professors give plainly to un- 
derstand that they love their temporal 
goods more than their undying souls, 
seeing they entrust their souls to such 
to whom they will not commit the 
adjusting of their temporal difficul- 
ties. Should, however, the contending 
parties befontf to differed societies or 
religious professions, it would lie ad- 
visable thatl ffkeft select several men 
md pledge themselves together to 
abide by the decision of those men, 
and thus in a short time, and at a 
trifling expense, the most important 
f"i:te-:s cmild b<> disposed of It is 
- ent with sound reason that 
neighbors, being acquainted with all 
■he circumstances i n both sides, are 

more eonuieti nf to decide cases than 
snangers who have m»t that aequaint- 
tance, and who>e jflrlsftneut frequently 
must depend npoil statements made by 
unprincipled tattlers, who for money 
will make right appear wr< npr, and 
wrong right. And then alter the 



parties have spent more in lawing 
than the matter in dispute was worth, 
and continued the suit for years, after 
all it is not unfrequently settled by 
arbitration. 

It is evident thnt lawyers are seldom 
at enmity with each other, but fre- 
quently decide cases between them- 
selves beforehand, and if one gains a 
case this time, he must allow the other 
to gain the next, whether right of 
wrong. Hence they may justly be com - 
pared to a pair of shears, the blades 
of which seem continually to be cut- 
ting each other, but^really they cut 
only that which comes between them. 

In Pennsylvania alone, more than 
ten thousand pounds might be saved 
annually, if men would refrain from 
contending at law, and have their dis- 
putes settled according to the fore- 
going plan. .But he that is not pleased 
with this method, and would rather 
choose the way of retaliation than of 
amity, will find information below of 
the time and places set apart when and 
where the vindictive may impeach one 
another. 

[Then follows a list of Courts.— Ed.] 



The Bible — What a blessed, what 
an abundant library the poor have in 
the Bible. I am confident that they 
find in that one book more enjoyment, 
more awakening truth, more lofty and 
beautiful imagery, nmiv culture to the 
whole soul, than thousands of iho edu- 
cated find in their general studies, and 
vastly more than millions among the 
rich find in that superficial transitory 
literature which consumes all> their 
read i tig hours. — IT. I eh. 



TicnT-LArixc. — Do young Indies 
know that the tetisi compression about 
the vital organs is very d.-i rimen'al to 
health y For wlmi r< as n d > ladies 
lace r Did they eVer find a man or a 
woman thnt admired a wa<p wni.M ? 
Do not sensible men and women look 
UjM.n such things as being awfully fool- 
ish ? It is for those who lace, but 
think they do not, that I write. — 
UWc/i. 



23 



Anecdotes of the Brethren, 

ALEXANDER MACK'S POWER OF DIS- 
CERNING SPIRITS. 

A preacher of extraordinary power 
and abilities was canvassing the coun- 
try, holding meetings everywhere 
among the Brethren, until at length he 
came to Germantown also, where the 
Brethren and almost everybody else 

. went to hear him ; all being dazzled 
and overcome with the power of his 
eloquence, and none could find words 
sufficient to exto) his fame. At length 
old Alexander Mack was also per- 
suaded to hear this wonderful man. 
After meeting, being asked by many 
eager to know what he thought of this 
great man, he meekly replied that he 
might do very well for afield preacher, 
(a military chaplain,) but not at all 
for a minister of the Gospel, and 
thought it were better for professors 
of it not even to hear him. 
p They of course felt mortified at this 
remark of the old brother. In about 

( a fortnight after, it was announced in 
a city paper that a certain regiment of 
soldiers was about ready to leave for 
a distant port, and wanted a man in 
the capacity of field preacher to accom- 
pany them. Ko sooner had he heard 
of it, than he was found on his way to 
the city, applied fo* the office, was ac- 
cepted, and went along as chaplain. 
Thus was the old man's prediction 
fulfilled to the letter. 

THE vBRETTIREN ON THE STORMY OCEAN. 

In the year 1719, when our Brethren 
fled from Creyfeld to seek for an asylum 
from their cruel persecutors in our 
highly favored America, they embarked 
from Friesllind in a large Flemish ves- 
sel, with several hundred passengers 
on bowel When about midway on 
the mighty ocean, a tremendous storm 
arose, so furious and of such long con- 
tinuation, that- ail hopes were given up 
for lost ; for the sea became so boister- 
ous that waves were piled upon waves 
mountain high, and threatened every 
moment to swallow up their frail 
barge. The sails were lowered, and 



brbid- 

;ions T ) \ 
md of 



much of the merchandise thrown over- 
board, but all was apparently of no 
avail ; until almost overcome with grief, 
and on the point of despair, the cap- 
tain happened to come down in the 
hold of the ship, which was occupied 
by the Brethren, (their poverty forbid- 
ding them better accommodate 
when lo ! he beheld the little bai 
Brethren all united together in a com- 
pany, and fervently engaged in singing 
and praying ! 

The captain was so struck on be- 
holding their calmness, and the pious 
serenity of their appearance, that he 
was moved to tears. He went imme- 
diately back, and began to admonish the 
consternated crew to take courage and 
to be of good cheer, as he no longer 
feared being lost, for he found that he 
had such pious men on board, that the 
Almighty would not, for their sakes, 
pernfit them to perish in the deep ! 
This inspired them with such confi- 
dence in the Almighty's protection, 
that they soon became calm and com- 
posed. The fury of the storm also 
abated, the sea became calm ; and the 
rest of the voyage was completed with- 
out any farther indication of danger. 

BROTHER JOHANN NAAS' ARREST. 

In the year IT 15 or '16, Johann 
Naas (one of the original Brethren) 
and Jacob Preisz travelled together, 
preaching and proclaiming the Gospel 
of our Lord through the country of .. 
Creyfelt to Marienborn and Epstein, 
at the time when the King of Prussia's 
recruiting officers were canvassing the 
country to recruit his forces. They 
compelled every one they met, of a 
goodly appearance, to enlist in the 
ranks of the soldiers, and n^ore par- 
ticularly did they aim at those of a tall, 
stately stature for the king's body or 
life guards, which was entirely com- 
posed of such. Therefore they left 
none of that class slip. 

.Johann iS'aas was just such a one, 
being a head taller than most any 
other man in that vicinity and a. so of 
a very stout, athletic constitution, ac- 



24 



companied with such grace and noble- 
ness of dejneanor, as at once to draw 
the admiration of a stranger. Preisz 
was the contrary, a small, decrepid 
kind of a man. So one day, as it hap- 
pened, they came in contact with these 
recruiting officers, when Naas was im- 
mediately seized and taken up to enlist ; 
but he refused, upon which they put 
him to various tortures to compel him, 
such as pinching, thumbscrewing, &c. 
But he still resisted, until at length 
they took him and hung him up with 
a cord by his left thumb and right great 
toe, in which ignominious posture they 
meant to leave him suspended until he 
would yield to their wishes. But he 
still continued steadfast and immova- 
ble, so that they began to despair of 
accomplishing anything by torture, 
and that he might die by leaving him 
longer suspended. So they took him 
down again, and dragged him alotf* by 
force to the king's audience, stating 
all how they hud tried, by persuasion 
and by torture, to accomplish their 
designs, to no purpose, and thinking 
him too desirable an object to let pass, 
they had brought him to his audience 
to dispose of as he thought proper. 

The king, then, eyeing him closely, 
said he would like to have him very 
much ; " tell me, why will you not en- 
list with me ?" 

"Because," said he, "I have al- 
ready, long ago, enlisted into one of 
the noblest and best of enrolments, 
fe and 1 would not, and indeed could 
not, become a traitor to Him." 

" Why, to whom, then ? Who is 
your captain V asked the astonished 
king. 

" My captain," said he, " is the great 
Prince Innnanuel, our Lord Jesus 
Christ. J have espoused his cause, 
and therefore cannot, and will not, 
forsake him." 

" Neii her will I then that you 
should," answered the nohle king, 
whilst reaching into his pocket to pre- 
sent hi m with a handsome gold coin as 
a reward for his fidelity, and bid him 
adieu. 

lie then went his way, greatly 



rejoiced at his honorable dismissal, and 
joined his companion Preisz. They 
continued their labors for awhile, 
until the persecution became so fierce 
that they fled with the others from the 
mother church to Serustervin, in West 
Friesland, from whence they emigrated 
to America in the fall of 1719, stopped 
awhile with the Brethren at German- 
town, and then settled in Am well, Xew- 
Jersey, where he and old brother Ru- 
dolph Harley founded the church 
which prospers to this day. 

A. H. Cassel. 



Items. 

While brethren Molsbee andWrights- 
man, then both of Tennessee, were trav- 
elling through Illinois, in 18G6, a 
stranger on the cars asked to see their 
pistols. Brother W. handed him his 
pocket Bible, saying, "that is our/ 
weapon." The stranger soon sought - 
other company. He did not like tlW 
looks of such armory. 



Non-Resistance. — In 1863, while 
on my way to Richmond, Va , to nego- 
tiate with the Confederate authorities, 
for exemption for our brethren, I met 
on the train a Methodist minister from 
North Carolina, who took his seat near 
by me. Presently he asked me whether 
I was a minister. I told him I was. He 
inquired of what persuasion. I told 
him the Brethren. He then wanted to 
know what we believed, and in enu- 
merating to him different points, I 
mentioned non-resistance. "And do 
you not believe," said he, "that it is 
right to fight for our glorious confed- 
eracy ?" To which I replied : " No ; 
for the Savior has said, ' Put up thy 
sword into its sheath, and that we are 
to love and do good to our enemies.' " 
(Soldiers in Confederate uniforms were 
thick around.) 

Mdliodist. — " Then do you not think 
General Washington was a good 
man?" 

" Mji Bible, sir, does not say any- 
thing about Washington." 

Methodist. — "Well, do you not think 



that God 'set up this government by 
Washington ?" 

" Yes," said I, " but does not God 
use one wicked nation to scourge 
another, and make use of individuals 
to carry out his purposes, and yet they 
be wicked ? And do you not think 
General Washington was a good man, 
and that God set up this government 
by him ?" 

Methodist.—" Yes, I do believe it. " 

" Then," said I, •" what do you think 
will become of you Confederates who 
are trying to pull down and destroy 
what God has built up." 

And they went their way, being 
condemned. 

P. R. Wrightsman. 



A Few Resolutions. 

The following are a few of the sev- 
enty resolutions of President Edwards : 
'Resolved, To do whatever I think to 
be my duty and most for the good and 
-advantage of mankind in general. 

Resolved, Never to lose one moment 
of time, but to improve it in the most 
profitable way. 

Resolved, To live with all my might 
while I clo live. 

Resolved, To maintain the strictest 
temperance in eating and drinking. 

Resolved, Never to speak anything 
but the pure and simple verity. 



25 

shadows approach, and turn away at 
the first harsh word or discouraging 
frown. 

Life's Troubles. — We may com- 
pare the troubles which we have to 
undergo in the course of this life to a 
great bundle of faggots, far too large 
for us to lift. But God- does not re- 
quire us to carry the whole at once ; 
Jie mercifully unties the bundle, and 
gives us first one stick, which we are 
to carry to-day, and then another 
which we are to carry to-morrow, and 
so on. This we might easily manage, 
if we would only take the burden ap- 
pointed for each day ; but we choose 
to increase our troubles by carrying 
yesterday's stick over again to-day, 
and adding to-morrow's burdens to 
our load before we arc required to 
bear it. 



A wise man will never rust out. 
As long as he breathes the breath of 
life he will be doing something for 
himself, his country, or posterity. 
Franklin, Howard, Young, Newton, all 
were at work almost to the last hour 
of their existence. It is a foolish thing 
to believe that we must lie down and 
die, simply because we are old. The 
man of energy is not old, it is only he 
who suffers his energies to waste away 
and permits the spring of his life to 
become motionless, on whose hands 
the hour drags heavily, and to whom 
all thing& wear the vestment of gloom. 
There are scores of gray heads living 
to-day that we would prefer in any im- 
portant enterprise to those young 
gentlemen who fear and tremble when 



The Memory of a Mother. 

When temptation appears, and we 
are almost persuaded to do wrong, 
how often a mother's word of warning 
will call to mind vows that are rarely 
broken. Yes, the memory of a mother 
has saved many a poor wretch from 
going astray. Tall grass may be grow- 
ing over the hallowed spot where all 
her earthly remains repose, and dying 
leaves of autumn may be whirled over 
it, or the white mantle of winter may 
cover it from sight ; yet the spirit of 
her when, he walks in the right path, 
appears, and gently, softly and mourn- 
fully calls to him when wandering off 
into the ways of error. 



If we could get a sight of our Fa- 
ther's house, and that great and fair 
city, the New Jerusalem, which is up 
above the sun and moon, we would 
cry to be over the water, and to be 
carried in Christ's arms out of this 
borrowed prison. 



Psalmody. — It is easier to sing 
heresy into people than to preach it 
into them. A great many persons 
know more of their hymn-books than 
they do of their Bibles. 



26 



Places and Dates of Annual 

Meetings. 

1870. Waterloo, Black Hawk Co., Iowa. 

1869. Boanoke Co., Va. 

1868. Bock Run, Elkbard Co., Ind. 

1867. Pipe Creek, Frederick Co., Md. 
1866. Autietam, Franklin Co., Pa. 
1865. Franklin Grove, Lee Co., 111. 
1864. Nettle Creek, Wayne Co., Ind. 

1868. Clover Creek, Blair Co., Pa. 
1862. Dayton, Montgomery Co., Ohio. 
1861. Beaver Creek, Rockingham, Va. I 
1860. Limestone, Washington Co., Tenn/ 
1859. Elklick, Somerset Co., Pa. 

1858. Bachelor's Run, Carroll, Ind. 
1857. Daniel Wolfe's, Wash. Co.,Md. 
1856. Lena, Stephenson Co., 111. 
1855. Aughwick, Huntingdon Co., Pa. 
1854. Elias Dickey's, Ashland Co., Ohio. 
1853. Beaver Dam, Frederick Co., Md. 
1852. Goshen, Elkhart Co., Ind. 
1851. New Hope, Augusta Co., Va. 
1850. Bear Creek, Montgomery Co., Ohio. 
1849. Berliu, Somerset Co., Pa. 
1848. Jacob Kurtz's, Wayne Co., Ohio. 
1847. Isaac Deardorff's, Franklin Co., Pa. 
1846. Conestoga, Lancaster Co., Pa. 
1845. Daniel Barnhart' s, Roanoke Co., Va. 
1844. Peter Deardorff's, York Co , Pa. 
1843. Mohican, Wayne Co., Ohio. 
1842. Beaver Dam, Frederick Co., Md. 
1841. Wm. Miller's, Somerset Co., Pa. 
1840. Yellow Creek, Bedford Co., Pa. 
1839. Aughwick, Huntingdon Co., Pa. 
1838. Washington Co., Md. 
1837. LiuwelPs creek, Va. Printed min- 
utes for the first time. 
1836. Schuylkill, Pa. 
1835. Cumberland County, Pa. 
1334. Stark County, Ohio". 
1833. Lost Creek, Pa. 
1832. Rockingham, Va. 
1831. Conestoga, Pa. 
1830. Pipe Creek, Md. 

Recapitulation. 

In the past thii ty-trhee years they 
have been held in the different States 
as follows : 

Pennsylvania 15 Indiana 4 

Maryland 6 Illinois 2 

Ohio 6 Tennessee 1 

Virginia 6 Iowa 1 



Annual Meeting of 18? 1, 

The annual meeting for the present year, 
is appointed to be held at the residence of 
brother John E. Merkey, in the Little 
Swatara congregation, Berks county, Pa., 
eight miles north of Meyerstown, a station 
on the Lebanon Valley Railroad. 



Names and Addresses of 

Ministers. 



Albaugh, Zachariah, Hagerstown, Ind. 
Allensworth, John B., Parkersburg, 111. 
America, Sylvanus, Merriam, Ind. 
Anglemyer, John, New Paris, Ind. 

B. 

Baily, Thomas, Mt. Etna, Ind. 
Bahr, Jacob, Moulton, la. 
Baker, Jonathan H., Myersville, Md. 
Bakener, Frederick, Quincy, Pa. . 
Barkley, Josiah, Somerset, Pa. 
Barkloo, Samuel, Ontario, la. 
Barkloo, David, Ontario, la. 
Barnhart, Daniel, Centropolis, Kan. 
Barnhart, John, Mahomet, 111. 
Barnhart, Abraham, Goginsville, Va. 
Barnhart, George, Goginsville. Va. 
Beahm, Henry, Salem, Va. 
Beagle, Eli, Dunkirk, O. 
Beaver, Adam, Lewisburg, Pa. 
Beaver, John L., Vicksburg, Pa. 
Beale, Jesse, Waterloo, la. 
Beckner, Abraham, Whitesburg, Tenn. 
Beckner, Perry, Bulls Gap, Tenn. 
Beer, Daniel, Micldletown, Md. 
Beer, Jos. W., Tyrone, Pa. -• 

Beer, Peter, Decker's Point, Pa. 
Beer, Solomon, Somerset, Pa. 
Beer, George, Middletown, Md. 
Beelman, Adam, Dillsburg, Pa. 
Bennet, James M., Jones' Mills, Pa. 
Benshoof, Solomon, Johnstown, Pa. 
Berkley, Cornelius, Myer's«Mills, Pa. 
Berkey, Jacob, Goshen, Ind. 
Berry, Thomas, Whitehorn, Tenn. 
Beshoar, Joseph, Whitesville, Mo. 
Blocher, David, Gettysburg, Pa. 
Blough, Emmanuel J., Davidsville, Pa. 
Blough, Tobias, Davidsville, Pa. 
Blough, Valentine, Somerset, Pa. 
Blough, Jacob, Berlin, Pa. 
Blough, Jonathan W., Dibertsville, Pa. 
Bock, David^ Greencastlc, Pa. 
Bock, Samuel, Ovid, Ind. 
Boice, Samuel, Elizabeth, W. Va. 
Bomberger, Christ., Rothsville, Pa. 
Bonebrake, D. H., Jackson Hall, Pa. 
Book, Edmond, Blain, Pa. 
Booze, Jacob, Coopersburg, Pa. 






' ■ 



27 



Borger, Joseph, Jones' Mills, Pa. 
Bosserman, Eleazer, Dunkirk, O. 
Bosserman, Daniel, Dunkirk, O. 
Bosserman, David, Gettysburg, Pa. 
Bowers, Peter, Noble, 111. 
Bowers, Abner, dowser's Mills, Ind. 
Bowers, A. J., Clowser's Mills, Ind. 
Bowers, Martin, Clark's Hill, Ind. 
Bower, John, Willow Springs, Kan. 
Bowser, Peter, Coclorus, 111. 
Bowman, John„Bonbrook, Va. 
Bowman, Benjamin, Dayton, Va. 
Bowman, Benjamin, Green Mount, Ya. 
Bowman, Daniel, Hagerstown, Ind. 
Bowman, Jacob, Hagerstown, Ind. 
Bowman, David, Hagerstown, Ind. 
Bowman, David, Dayton, Ya. i 
Boyer, William, Mount Alto, Pa. 
Boyer, Allen, Lena, 111. 
Boyle, Philip, New Windsor, Md. 
Brallier, Samuel, Ebensburg, Pa. A 

Brindle, Cyrus, Allen, Pa. 
Brindle, John, Greason, Pa. 
Brower, David, South English, la. 
Brown, P. J., Congress, O. 
Brown, Adam, Hampton, Pa. 
Brower, John, Hermitage, Ya. 
Brower, Enoch, Hermitage, Ya. 
Brown, Joel, Ervin, Ind. 
Brower, Jacob, South English, la. 
Brower, Daniel, Waynesborro, Ya. 
Bruss, ^illiain^^nfe^och, Ind. # 

Brubaker, John, Salem, Ya. 
Bmbaker, Elias, Salem, Va. 
Brunk, Joseph, Monomonee, Wis. 
Brubaker, Peter, Centropolis, Kan. 
Brubaker, Moses, Salem, Va. 
Brumbaugh, George, Clover Creek, Pa. 
Brumbaugh, J. W., Clover Creek, Pa. 
Brumbaugh, Geo. W., Clover Creek, Pa. 
Brumbaugh, Isaac, James Creek, Pa. 
Brumbaugh, George B., James Creek, Pa. 
Brumbaugh, H. B., James. Creek, Pa. 
Brumbaugh, John, James Creek, Pa. 
Brumbaugh, George, James Creek, Pa. 
Bryant, William, Clark's Hill, Ind. 
Bucher, Christian, Shaefferstown, Pa. 
Bucher, George, Cornwall, Pa. 
Bucher, John, Abbottstown, Pa. 
Buchalew, William, Broadway Depot, Va. 
Buechley, E. K., Waterloo, la. 
Buechley, Emmanuel, Waterloo, la. 
* Buechley, Jeremiah, Accident, Md. 



Buechley, David, Lhcomb, la. 
Buechley, Benjamin, Hudson, la. 
Buechley, Benjamin, Jane Lev, W. Va. 
Burkhart, Joseph, Mineral Po nt, Pa. 
Burkholder, John, Kew Paris Ind. 
Burger, Joseph, Done :al, Pa. 
Bushman, Michael, Gettysburg, Pa. 
Butterbaugh, Jacob. I iscomb, la. 
Byers, William, Ebensburg, Pa. 

C. 

Cadwalader, John. Pleasant Hill, 0. 
Calvert, Ira, Lawrenceville, 111. 
Calvert, Jesse, Mil ford, Ind. 
Calvin, Moses, Mt. Etna, Ind. 
Cassel, Abraham, Lower Providence, Pa. 
Cassel, Henry, Royer's Ford, Pa. 
Caylor, John H., Noblesville, Ind. 
Clapper, Henry, Yellow Creek, Pa. 
Clark, William, Inwood, Ind. 
Clay, Henry, SpringfieLl, Mo. 
Clay, Henry, Willar 1, Mo. 
Cline, Jacob, Mt. Sidney, Ya. 
Cline, John, Broadway Depot, Ya. 
Cline, Frederick, Mt. Clintdh, Ya. 
©line, Michael, Broadway Depot, Ya. 
Cline, Samuel, Cross Keys, Ya. 
Cober, Ephraim, Be.lin, Pa. 
Cober, John P., Berlin, Pa. 
Cochanower, Emmanuel, East Berlin, Pa 
Coder, ^Martin, Dawson Station, Pa. 
Coontz/Henry, Waynesboro, Pa. 
Corder, James H., Livingston, la. 
Correll, A. J., Romeo, Tenn. 
Cost, Andrew, Beaver Creek, Md. 
Cox,. Samuel M., Sabbath Re ;t, Pa. 
Cripe, George, Warsaw, Ind. 
Cripe, Daniel, Pettit, Ind. 
Cripe, Isaac, Pyrmont, Ind. 
Crist, John, Yirden, 111. 
Cripe, Joseph, Salem, 111. 
Crosswhite, Jesse, Jonesboro, Tenn. 
Crumpacker, Abraham, Blacksburg, Va. 
Crunipacker, Peter, Blacksburg, Va. 
Custer, Christ, 409 Franklin St., Phila., Pa 

£) 

D. 

Davy, H. D., Casstown, O. 
Deardorff, A. M., Franklin Grove, 111. 
Deardorff, Daniel, Franklin Grove, 111. 
Deeter, Absalom, Marshalltown, la. 
Derrick, David D., Roger^vilie, Tenn. 
Detrick, Abraham, Salem, 0. 



• 



28 



Dice, Philip, Newtonia, Mo. 
Dill, Philip, Newtonia, Mo. 
Domer, George, Milford, Ind. 
Drake, Jesse, Milford, Ind. 
Driver, Samuel, Clmrckville, Va. 
Durand, Sylvester, Waterville, Minn. 
Durst, John R., Shade Mills, Md. 



Ebersole, John P., Fostoria, O. 
Eby, Enoch, Duncannon, 111. 
Eby, Isaac, New Gerniantown, Pa. 
Eckerman, Daniel, Middlesprings, Pa. 
Eikenberry, Isaac, Delphi, Ind. 
Emniert, Michael, Adaline, 111. 
Eshleman, John, Woodberry, Pa. 
Eshleman, David, Mohrsville, Pa. 
Eshleman, John, Ottawa, Kan. 
Etter, William, Charabersburg, Pa. 
Etter, John, Salem, Va. 

P. 

Fisher, Jacob H., Batavia, la. 
Flack, George, Congress, £). 
Flory, Abraham, Delphi, Ind. 
Flory, Jacob, Delphi, Ind. 
Flory, J. S., Fayetteville, W. Va. 
Flory, Jacob, Goginsville, Va. 
Fogelsangcr, J. R., Shippensburg, Pa. 
Fogelsanger, David, Shippensburg,~Pa. 
Forney, Michael, Parkersburg, 111. 
Forney, Samuel M., Parkersburg, t 111. 
Forney, Edmond, Polo, 111. 
Foust, Jeremiah, Jones' Mills, Pa. 
Fowler, Marcus, Yellow Creek, 111. 
Franklin, Win. H., Sam's Creek, Md. 
Franlz, Abraham, Degraff, O. 
Fran*/., J. L., DegrafT, 0. 
Frantz, David, Cerro Gordo, 111* 
Freed, Peter, Dunkirk, O. 
Fry, Daniel, Lena, 111. 
Funk, A. L., Shirleysburg, Pa. 
Funk, Peter, Polo, 111. 
Funk, Benjamin, Singer's Glenn, Va. 
Furry, Leonard, New Enterprise, Pa. 

G. 

Gable, Emmanuel, East Berlin, Pa. 
Garbcr, Mi.liael, New Hope, Va. 

" r, S. A., Leon, la. 
Outer, Jobn B., Shirleysburg, Pa. 
Garbrr, Joseph, Tipton, la. 

ilx r. Solomon, Bridgewater, Va. 
Garber, Abraham, Mt. Sidney, Va. 



Garber, Levi, Mt. Sidney, Va. 
Garlach, David, Mt. Joy, Pa. 
Garss, Henry, Pleasant Hill, Tenn. 
Garver, Jacob, Lattasburg, O. «v 
Garver, Joseph, Congress, O. 
Gibble, John, Manheim, Pa. 
Gibson, D. B., Plattsburg, Mo. 
Gibson, C. C, Girard, 111. 
Gipe, Joseph, Chambersburg, Pa. 
Gish, Henry, Camden, Ind. 
Glass, Lewis, North Georgetown, 0. 
Glock, John G., Shirleysburg, Pa. 
Gnagy, Joel, Myers Mills, Pa. 
Good, Daniel F., Waynesboro, Pa. 
Goodman, John W., Woburn, 111. 
Gottwals, John, Fairview, Pa. 
Gottwals, Jacob, Z., Shannonville, Pa. 
Gouchenour, H. C, Waterloo, la. 
Graham, Thomas, Brooklyn, la. 
Gray, Thomas, York, Pa. 
Gray, Tazwell, Lancaster, Mo. 
Gray bill, Samuel, Manheim, Pa. 
Grosanickle, David, Ladiesburg, Md. 

H. 

Hackman, Jacob, Brunersville, Pa. 
Hall, Larken, Marshalltown, la. 
Hamilton, Heil, Poplar Grove, Ind. 
Hanawalt, Jos. R., McVeyton, Pa. 
Hanawalt, George, McVeyton, Pa. 
Harley, Samuel, Ephrata, Pa. 
* larley, Samuel, Harley sVille, Pa. 
Harley, Jonas, Harley svi lie. Pa. 
Harley, Benjamin, Royer's Ford, Pa. 
Harper, Addison, Harden, Mo. 
Ilarshberger, Henry, Salem, 111. 
Harshbergcr, Henry, Bloody Run, Pa. 
Ilarshberger, John J., Cross Keys, Va. 
Ilarshberger, John, Johnstown, Pa. 
Harshey, John, Cornelia, Mo. 
Harris, James, Moorsburg, Tenn. 
Hart, John, Lawrencevillc, Ind. 
Hart man, Christian, Mt. Meridian, Va. 
Hartzler, William, Elizabcthtown, Pa. 
Hartsough, Joseph, Larwill, Ind. 
Hardman, Joseph, Milford, Ind. 
Hashberger, John, Port Republic, Va. 
Heiney, Daniel, Antioch, Ind. 
ILmdricks, Daniel, Coon Creek, Mo. 
Hendricks, Franklin, Coon Creek, Mo. 
Hertzler, John, Crosskill, Pa. 
Hetric t Jesae P., Oakland, Pa. 
Heyser, Emanuel, Madison, Ga. 



29 



Highberger, Jacob, Sharpsburg, Md. 
Hildebrand, Stephen, Mineral Point, Pa. 
Hildebrand, David, Conemaugh, Pa. 
Hillery, Lemuel, Marshalltown, la. 
Himes, Levi, Rogersville, Ind. 
Hipe, William, Lime Springs, la. 
Hire, Absalom, Palestine, 111. 
Hobbs, C. L., Plattsburg, Mo. 
Hochstettler, Abraham, Waterloo, la. 
Hochstettler, Henry P., Dibertsville, Pa. 
Hoff, Henry, Dughill, Md. 
Holsinger, D. M., Duncansville, Pa. 
Holsinger, Daniel, Waynesboro, Pa. 
Holsinger, Henry R., Tyrone, Pa. 
Holsinger, John, Luray, Ind. 
Holsinger, John S., Alum Bank, Pa. 
. Holsinger, John, Woodbury, Pa. 
Hollinger, Adam, Bermudian, Pa. 
Hollinger, Daniel, Vfhite House, Pa. 
Hollinger, Jacob, White House, Pa. 
Hollowbush, Peter, Pottstown, Pa. 
Holsople, Joseph, Indiana, Pa. 
Holsople, Jacob, Scalplevel, Pa. 
Hoover, Cyrus, Summit, O. 
Hoover, George, Sulphur Springs, Ind. 
Hoover, George A., Graceham, Md. 
Hoover, George, Mechanicstown, Md. 
Hoppock, J. D., Sergeantsville, N. J. 
Horner, D. D., Jones 1 Mills, Pa. 
Horner, William M., Meyers' Mills, Pa. 
How, William, Lewistown, Pa. 
Humble, William, Willard, Mo. 
Hutchison, A., Centre View, Mo. 
Hutchison, Joseph, Oak Hill, W. Va. ' 
Hutchison, Samuel J., Oak Hill, W. Va. 
Hyde, Robison, Sand Brook, N. J. 
Ilyer, Leonard, Merriam, Ind. 
Hyer, Wesley, Columbia City, Ind. 



Iken berry, W., Waterloo,' la. 
Irwin, George, Golden Corner, O. 
Isenberg, Simeon, Rogersville, Tenn. 
Iset, John, Grater's Ford, Pa. 



Jewett, George W., Huntington, Iud. 
John, Chrisman, Adrian, Pa. 

K. 

Kauffman, Jos., De Graff, 0. 
Keim, Silas C, Elklick, Pa. 
Keim, Jacob S., Centropolis, Kan. 



Keller, Daniel, Dickinson, Pa. 
Kelso, Jacob, Elderton, Pa, 
Kelso, Jonathan, Elklick, Pa. 
Kilhemer, Henry, Ashland, O. 
Kimmell, Lewis, Elderton, Pa. 
Kimmel, David, Auburn, 111. 
Kindig, Joshua, Mohrville, Pa. 
King, Joshua, Tuckerton, Pa. 
Kinsey, Lewis, Millville, Ind. 
Kinsey, Samuel, Da} r ton, O. 
Kingery, Christian H., Camden, Ind. 
Kline, David, Timberville, Ya. 
Kline, Frederick, Bridgewater, Va. 
Kline, Samuel, New Market, Va. 
Kniseley, John, Plymouth, Ind. 
Kob, Lewis M., Franklin, la. 
Koub, Jacob, Centropolis, Kan. 
Koub, John, Centropolis, Kan. 
Kurtz, Henry, Columbiana, O. 
Kurtz, Jacob, East Union, O. 
Kurtz, Jacob H., Middletown, 0. 

• L. 

Lane, James R., Hill Valleyf Pa. 
Layman, Harvey, BonbrooV, Va. 
Leatherman,, George, Myereville, Md. 
Leatherman, Peter, Middletown, Md. 
Leatherman, John, Milford, Ind. 
Leedy, Abraham, Antioeh, Ind. 
Leedy, John, Dorce, Ind. 
Leedy, Jonas, New Holland, Ind. 
Leedy, Joseph, Antioeh, Ind. 
Lehman, Joseph C, Franklin Grove, 111. 
Lehman., Samuel, jr., Franklin Grove, 111. 
Lehman, Samuel, Warransville, 111. 
Lerew, Jacob P., York Sulphur Springs, Pa. 
Lesh, Christian, Delphi, Ind. 
Lichty, Jonas, Elklick, Pa. 
Lidy, Samuel, Nolo, Pa. 
Lierley, William R., Liberty, 111. 
Lint, C. G., Meyers' Mills, Pa. 
Livengood, David, Elklick, Pa. 
Loehr, F. P., Bloomingdale, Mich. 
Lohr, Samuel, Donegal, Pa. 
Long, Jacob F., Goginsville, Vat 
Long, Christian, Adel, la. 
Long, Peter, New Germanft*vn, Pa. 
Long, George, Mongoquinong, ]*ul. 
Long, Samuel, Haldane, 111. H 
Long, Isaac, Port Republic,*Va. 
Longenecker, Samuel, Montandou, Pa. 
Longenecker, Daniel, Hunterstown, Pa. 



30 



Longenecker, Henry, Pleasant Hill, O. 
Losh, Barnett, Albion, 111. 
Lyon, Thomas D., Hudson, 111. 

Me 

Mack, Jacob, Vermont, 111. 
Maddocks, T. B., Clover Creek, Pa. 
Marshall, Christopher, Maple Grove, Ind. 
Martin, David, Grinnell, la. 
Matter, Solomon, Yellow Creek, 111. 
•McC Unlock, W. G., Crescent Hill, Mo. 
McClintock, John, Liberty, 111. 
McMnllen, James, Smithville, O. 
Merrill, Nathaniel, Frostburg, Md. 
Merkey, David, Bethel, Pa. 
Metzger, John W., Pettit, Ind. 
Metzger, Stephen, Rossville, Ind. 
Metzger, Henry, Camden, Ind. 
Metzger, John, Cerro Gordo, 111. 
Metzler, John, Wakarusa, Ind. 
Meyers, Henry, Falls City, Neb. 
Michael, Joseph, Pontiac, 111. 
Miller, Stephen, Milford, Lid. 
Miller, Andrew, Farmer.'sT*. 0., Pa. 
Miller, Frederick, Cross Keys, Ya. 
Miller, R. H.,*Ladoga, Ind. 
Miller, S. M., Waterloo, la. • 
Miller, Jeremiah, Jones 1 Mills, Pa. 
Miller, Jacob, Woodbeny, Pa. • 
Miller, Moses, Mechanicsburg, Pa. • 
.- Miller, Jacob D., Somerset, Pa. • 
Miller, Jacob, South Bend, Ind. * 
Miller, Joel, Dughill, Md. • 
Miller, David, Polo, 111. • 
Miller, Daniel, Mercersburg, Pa. • 
Miller, Ed. S., Hagerstown, Md. ' 
Miller, Daniel P., Chambersburg, Pa. ' 
Miller, Daniel, Frederick, la. t 
Miller, John, Mt. Sidney, Ya. ! 
Miller, Martin, Otterbine, Ya. 
Miller, Joseph, Otterbine, Ya. 
Miller, Joseph, Sangersville, Ya. 
Miller, Jacob, Green Mound, Ya. 
Miller, Beujamin, Green Mound, Ya. 
Miller, John II., Milford, Ind. 
Minnich, •Stephen M., Antioch, Ind. 
Minser, Mark, Decker's Point, Pa. 
Moats, Johnftot. Morris, 111. 
^^.JMohler, -facqj), Lewistown, Pa. 
Moliler, S.*^, Cornelia, Mo. 
Mohler, Ale" Rossville, Ind. 
Mohler, Rudolph, Covington, Ohio. 
Mohler, Samuel, Pleasant Hill, Ohio. 



Moller, John, Hagerstown, Ind. 
Molsbee, Samuel, Rogersville, Tenn. 
Molsbee, Abranam, Rogersville, Tenn. 
Montz, Lewis, Milford, Ind. 
Moore, S. A., New Enterprise, Pa. 
Moore, John H., Urbana, 111. 
Moomaw, B. F., Bonsacks, Ya. 
Moomaw, John C, Clover Dale, Ya. 
Moomaw, Daniel C, Clover Dale, Ya. 
Mosser, Samuel, McYeytown, Pa. 
Mourer, George, Upton, Pa. 
Murray, Jacob, Waterloo, la. 
Murray, Samuel, Lancaster Box, Hunting- 
ton,. Ind. 
Murray, James, Ryerson's Station, Pa. 
Murray, John, Quarry, la. 
Murray, Frederick, Jones 1 Mills, Pa. 
Myers, Grabill, Eldorado, Pa. 
Myers, Isaac, Mifflinburg, Pa. 
Myers, William S., Somerset, Pa. 
Myers, Peter S., McYeytown, Pa. 
Myers, Abraham, McYeytown, Pa. 
Myers, Andrew, Logansville, Pa. „ 
Myers, Tobias, Somerset, Pa. 
Myers, Israel, Ephrata, Pa. 
Myers, Jonathan, Antioch, Pa. 
Myers, Joseph, Baresville, Pa. 
Myers, Samuel R., Baresvile, Pa. 
Myers, Christian, Pleasant Yiew, Pa. 
Myers, Abraham, Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 
Myers, George S., Lewistown, Pa. 
Myers, George, Yanwert, Pa. 
Myers, Martin, Lanark, 111. 
Myers, Isaac, Nora, 111. 
Myers, Isaac S., New Hope, Ya. 
Myers, Joseph, East Berlin, Pa. 
Myers, Samuel, Morristown, Tenn. 

Naff, Isaac, Auburn, Ills. 
Nail, Joseph, Ginsville, Ya. 
Nead, Peter, Dayton, O. 
Nead, D. R. C, Stirrup Grove, Ills. 
Neff, Daniel, New Paris, Ind. 
Neff, Isaac, Goginsville, Ya. 
Neff, Henry, New Paris, Ind. 
Neff, John, Mt. Jackson, Ya. 
Negley,- Jacob, Ottawa, Kan. 
Neher, Andrew, Salem, Ills. 
Neher, Martin, Cerro Gordo, Ills. 
Neher, Daniel, Rossville, Ind. 
Ness, Christian, Logansville, Pa. 
Newcomer, Melcher, Mt. Morris, Ills. 



31 



Newcomer, Emmanuel, Adaline, Ills. 
Newcomer, J. S., Colombia, Pa. 
Newcomer, John, Mouutville, Pa. 
Newcomer, John, Middle Spring, Pa. 
Nice, William, Harleyville, Pa. 
Nicholson, John, Slianesville, Ohio. 
Ninninger, Peter, sr., Amsterdam, Va. 



Oblinger, Samuel, Waterville, Minn. 
Ogg, Joseph, Waukohee, Minn. 
Oiler, Jacob F., Waynesboro, Pa. 
Overholtzer, Peter, Polo, Mo. 



Pannebaker, Win., Honey Grove, Pa. 
Pence, John, Freedom, Tenn. 
Peters, Abraham, Goginsville, Va. 
Peters, Joel, Bonbrook, Ya. 
Pfoutz, Isaac, Johns ville, Md. ' 
Pfoutz, Abraham, Cross Kill, Pa. ' 
Pheil, Abraham, St. Thomas, Pa. 
Pheil, Adam, St. Thomas, Pa. 
Pippinger, John, Monomonie, Wis. 
Plaine, B. E., Panora, la. 
Plain e, D. H., Bonsacks, Va. 
Poulson, Israel, Ringold, N. J. 
Price, Isaac, Schuylkill, Pa. 
Price, Jacob, Waynesboro, Pa. 
Price, David E., Mt. Morris, Ills. 
Price, John W., Fitzwatertown, Pa. 
Price, Wtn., Shoeneck, Pa. 
Price, Henry, Harleysville, Pa. 
Price, Jonas, Hatfield, Pa. 
Price, John, Lewistown, Pa. 
Province, David, Columbia, Mo. 



Quinter, James, Covington, 0. 
Quinn, Wra. H., McMeveys' Fort, Pa, 

R. 

Raffensperger, J. H., Clearsprings, Pa. 
Raffensperger, Levi, Nachusa, Ills. 
Reinhold, Jacob, Lancaster, Pa. 
Renner, Isaac, Ladiesburg, Md. 
Replogle, Abraham, Unionville, la. 
Replogle, J. B., Woodberry, Pa. 
Riddle, Samuel, Highland, la. 
Rider, Jacob, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Riner, Jacob K., Line Lexington, Pa. 
Rinehart, John, Erving, Ind. 
Riffee, John R., Jane Lew, W. Va. 
Rife, Jacob, Boston, Ind. 



Roberts, C. P. L., Hudson, la. 
Robey, Wm. H., River Falls, Wis. 
Rohrer, Jos. F., SmitltBurg, Md. 
Roop, Jesse, Linganore. Md. 
Root, C. C, Mirabile, Mo. 
Rothanuel, Joshua, Leesport, Pa. 
Rothanuel, Jeremiah, Reading, Pa. 
Rowland, David W., Westminister, Md. 
Royer, Isaac, Queen City, Mo. 
Royer, Charles, Mifflinburg, Pa. 
Rupp, Christ, Baresville, Pa. 

S. 

Sayler, D. P., Double Pipe Creek, Md. 
Sayler, Daniel R. f Double Pipe Creek, Md. 
Sayler, Daniel K;, Johnsville, Md. 
Sayler, Henry, Johnsville, Md. 
Schrock, George, Berlin, Pa. 
Schrack, John C, Somerset, Pa. 
Sell, James A., Newry, Pa. 
Sell; Jos. B., Altoona, Pa. 
Sell, Daniel D., Plattsburg, Mo. 
Sell, Wm. B., Hamilton, Mo. 
Sell, Abraham, Hamilton, Mo. 
Sellars, John, Bourbon, Ind. 
Senseney, A. H., Uniontown, Md. 
Seiber, Solomon, Thomsontown, Pa. 
Sergon, Stephen, Jonesville, Va. 
Shamberger, Jacob, Beckleysville, Md. 
Shank, Christian, Lawrence, Kan. 
Shank, John, Greencastle, Pa. 
Sharp, S. Z., Marysville, Tenn. 
Sharer, George, Mourertown, Va. 
Sherfey, Joseph, Gettysburg, Pa. 
Sherfay, S. S., Johnson's Depot, Tenn. 
Shideler, Daniel, Mcjenica, Ind. 
Shirk, Jacob B., Eldora, la. 
Shiveley, Joel, Oseola, Ind. 
Shiveley, David, Bourbon, Ind. 
Shiveley, Jacob B., In wood, Ind. 
Shiveley, John, Pyrmont, Ind. 
Shiveley, Daniel, New Paris, Ind. 
Shong, Daniel, Brunersburg, O. 
Show alter, Christ. J., Big Tree, Pa. 
Shoemaker, J. B., Smithville, 0. 
Shuler, Moses, Wescosville, Pa. 
Simmons, Christian, TRogersvilleJ Tenn'. 
Sivitz, Wm., Berlin, Pa. 
Slifer, Emmanuel, Burkidsville, Md. 
Smith, Daniel, Hagerstown, Ind. 
Smith, William, Haldane, Kls. 
Smith, George, Pine Grove, Pa. 
Snowberger, Jos., Williamsburg, Pa. 
Snowbergcr, Daniel, New Enterprise, Pa. 



32 



Snowberger, Andrew, Bloody Run, Pa. 
Snowberger, John S., Monticello, Ind. 
Snyder, Aaron B., Urbana, Ills. 
Snyder, Adam F., Somerset, Pa. 
Snyder, Thos. G., Dry Creek, la. 
Snyder, J. S., Brooklyn, Iowa. 
Spanogle, Andrew, Shirleysburg, Pa. 
Spanogle,. John, Hill Valley, Pa. 
Spanogle, Jacob, 1116 Green st. Phila., Pa. 
Spicher, J. W., Hillsdale, Pa. 
Spicher, J., Waterloo, la. 
Stamy, Abraham,' Dry Creek, la. 
Stamy, Solomon, Dry Creek, la. 
Stamy, John F., Lees Cross Roads, Pa. 
Steel, Jacob, Yellow Cr%ek, Pa. 
Stiteley, David, Johnsville, Md. 
S toner, E. W., Union Bridge, Md. 
Stoner, Solomon, Uniontown, Md. 
Stover, Jacob, Greencastle, Pa. 
Stout, Wm. J., High Point, la. 
Strickler, Wm. E., Centreville, la. 
Strickler, Henry P., Eldorado, la. 
Studabaker^ George W., Muncie, Ind. 
Studabaker, Jesse, Pleasant Hill, 0. 
Sturgis, D. B., South Bend, Ind. 
Studebaker, Daniel, Clinton, Kan. 
Summy, Abraham, Ridge View, Pa. 
Swigart, Saml. J., McVeytown, Pa. 
Swihart, Jonathan, Pontiac, Ills. 
Swonger, Michael, DeGraff, O. 



Thomas, Jacob, OSterbine, Va. 
Thompson, Archibald, Whitesburg, Tenn. 
Thompson, Joshua, Ovid, Ind. 
Trostle, Jacob D., Linganore, Md. 
Trostle, Levi, Taylor, Ills. 

U. 

Ullery, David, Osceola, Mo. 
Ullery, Samuel, Pyrmont, Ind. 
Ulrich, John H., Huntington, Ind. 
Umbaugh, Jonas, Pierceton, Ind. 
Umstead, John H., Port Providence, Pa. 



V&nDyke, Archy, Lewistown, Pa. 
Vaniman, Daniel, Virden, Ills. 
Vaught, George, Elizabeth, W. Va. 
Vorhees, Isaac, Wakarusa, Ind. 

w> 

Wagoner, Jacob, Petit, Ind. 



Walker, Danl. P., Berlin, Pa. 
Wampler, Jos.. Knobnoster, Mo. 
Wampler, Samuel, Broadway Depot, Va. 
Wampler, Frederick, Broadway Depot,Va 
Wanderlich, Charles, Richland, la. 
Watters, Jacob O., Dry Creek, la. 
Weaver, Moses, Ashland, O. 
Wells, Levi, Plumville, Pa. 
Wengert, C, South Bend, Ind. 
Werbz, Christian, Cave Springs, Va. 
Wetzel, Paul, Lena, Ills. 
Weyand, Michael, Somerset, Pa. 
Whetstone, David, New Boston, Minn. 
Whetzell, Elias, Shade Mills, Md. 
Whitacre, Robert, Plumville, Pa. 
White, Pleasant, Bull's Gap, Tenn. 
Wimer, Frederick, Dawson Station, Pa. 
Wine, John, Otterbine, Va. 
Wine, George, si\, Otterbine, Va. 
Wine, George, jr., Otterbine, Va. 
Wine, Christ., Broadway Depot, Va. 
Wine, Joseph, Blountville, Tenn. 
Wineland, J. L., Clover Creek, Pa. 
Wirt, C. F., New Boston, Minn. 
Wise, Adam, Cameron, W. Va. 
Wise, David, Camden, Ind. 
Wise, John, Scenery Hill, Pa. 
Witmer, D. M., Ashland, 0. 
Wit more, Jacob, Dunkirk, O. 
Witwer, George, Hamilton, Mo. 
Wolfe, David, Liberty, Ills. 
Wolfe, George, Stockton, Cal. 
Wolfe, Daniel, Fairplay, Md. 
Workman, Levi, Pierceton, Ind. 
Worst, George, New Pittsburg, O. 
Worst, Henry, New Pittsburg, O. 
Wrightsman, P. R., Dayton, O, 

Y. 

Yoder, E. L., Madisonburg, O. 
Yoder, Jacob D., Unionville, la. 
Younce, Davis, Pleasant Hill, 0. 
Young, Daniel, Upton, Pa. 

Z. 

Zeigler, Samuel, Broadway Depot, Va. 
Ziegler, Philip, Mastersonville, Pa. 
Ziegler, Joseph, Merriam, Ind. 
Zook, Daniel, Unionville, la. 
Zook, John, Shady Grove, Pa. 
Zook, Joseph, Unionville, la. 
Zug, S. R., Mastersonville, Pa. 
Zug, John, ShaeHerstown, Pa. 



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